ABA Journal

Privacy Law

1170 ABA Journal Privacy Law articles.

Weekly Briefs: SCOTUS approval rating plummets; Trumps lose deposition appeal

SCOTUS approval rating drops 10 percentage points

Only 44% of the public approves of the way that the U.S. Supreme Court is handling its job, according to a Marquette University…

Weekly Briefs: McDonald’s, Wendy’s sued over burger ads; ICE is ‘a domestic surveillance agency,’ report says

Ads exaggerate size of McDonald’s, Wendy’s burgers, suit says

Food stylists for McDonald’s and Wendy’s undercook hamburger patties portrayed in advertising to make them appear 15% to 20% larger than…

Supreme Court justices get around-the-clock security after leak of draft abortion opinion; 25 state AGs call for action

U.S. Supreme Court justices began getting around-the-clock security last week, as protesters who fear an end to abortion rights gathered outside the homes of conservative justices.

Alito sidesteps question about collegiality during remote appearance at law school

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito, author of the leaked draft opinion overturning Roe v. Wade, managed to evade a question about Supreme Court collegiality during a remote law school appearance Thursday.

Could SCOTUS leaker be charged with crime? Espionage Act wouldn’t apply, but other laws might

Could the person who leaked U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito’s draft abortion opinion be charged with a crime? It’s possible, even though the Espionage Act wouldn’t apply, according to experts.

California bill would discourage secrecy in court orders and settlements

A bill that cleared California’s Senate Judiciary Committee last month would discourage secrecy about safety hazards discovered in litigation.

Wiretapping’s origins might surprise you

On the cover of author Brian Hochman’s book is a martini cocktail complete with a skewered olive. Hochman shares the real story that inspired the cover in this new podcast episode.

Is Alito right about the ‘unbroken tradition of prohibiting abortion’? Scholars disagree on the history

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito’s draft abortion opinion that would overturn Roe v. Wade says the 1973 decision “either ignored or misstated” the history of abortion laws.

Legal experts fear loss of abortion right could usher in end of same-sex marriage, other rights

In the two days since Politico published a draft U.S. Supreme Court opinion that seems to strike down Roe v. Wade, several legal experts have expressed concerns that the same reasoning that eliminates the right to abortion could also put other constitutional rights at risk.

What does the original Roe v. Wade really say?

The U.S. Supreme Court appears poised to strike down Roe v. Wade, a landmark decision from 1973 that established a woman’s constitutional right to abortion. Norma McCorvey, a single, pregnant woman in Texas, brought a federal lawsuit in 1970 against district attorney Henry Wade, alleging that Texas criminal abortion statutes that originated in 1854 were unconstitutional.

Alito’s leaked draft opinion shows Supreme Court is likely to strike down Roe v. Wade

The U.S. Supreme Court intends to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, according to a draft majority opinion obtained and published by Politico on Monday night. The Supreme Court verified on Tuesday that it is a genuine draft, and Chief Justice John Roberts has ordered the marshal of the court to investigate the leak.

Judge won’t toss $13B suit against Baker Donelson and insurer for alleged spying on litigant

A state court judge in Georgia has refused to toss a $13 billion lawsuit alleging that Baker Donelsen and American Family Insurance conspired to spy on a litigant with illegally placed electronic devices.

Law firm’s managing partner had a ‘fixation’ with employee surveillance, wiretap suit says

The managing partner of a Chicago law firm apparently monitored his employees with video cameras and a telephone system that allowed recording of phone calls, according to a lawsuit filed last week in federal court in Chicago.

Chicago Park District seeks to seal lawyer’s suit claiming mayor defamed him in obscenity-laced Zoom call

The Chicago Park District is seeking to seal a lawsuit filed by a former park district lawyer contending that Mayor Lori Lightfoot defamed him by questioning his legal ability in an obscenity-laced Zoom call.

I Spy: As more companies surveil workers at home, do laws do enough to protect privacy?

When demand for employee monitoring technology soared as millions moved from the office to remote work during the coronavirus pandemic, class action lawyer Benjamin F. Johns took note. “When everyone went remote, it heightened the concerns about privacy. And while employees do have to give up some of their rights, just by virtue of the employer-employee relationship, they don’t give up all their privacy rights,” Johns says.

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