Privacy Law

1134 ABA Journal Privacy Law articles.

Afternoon Briefs: California defends bar exam facial-recognition tech; pants-on-fire lawyer arrested

California bar responds to disparate impact allegation regarding facial recognition technology

After receiving a Feb. 10 demand letter to remove facial recognition technology from the remote bar exam on…

Advanced border searches of electronic devices don’t require probable cause, 1st Circuit rules
A federal appeals court has upheld government policies that allow basic searches of electronic devices at the border without reasonable suspicion and advanced searches only with reasonable suspicion.
Immigration lawyer sues over seizure of his cellphone at airport
Texas immigration lawyer Adam A. Malik has sued the U.S. Department of Homeland Security for seizing and retaining his iPhone when he returned to the United States from a trip to Costa Rica.
Afternoon Briefs: Dentons merges with another firm; dad can’t be banned from procreating, court rules

Dentons will combine with Alabama law firm

Dentons has announced that it will combine with Sirote & Permutt, an Alabama law firm with 86 lawyers and offices in five locations.…

9th Circuit revives lawyer’s suit against ex-husband for alleged email snooping
A federal appeals court on Tuesday revived a Washington lawyer’s suit contending that her then-husband violated the Stored Communications Act by accessing her work emails.
CDC plans to collect data on vaccine recipients, leading to privacy concerns
Some states are objecting to a requirement that they share information on vaccine recipients with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Judge allows lawsuit against Cardi B over ‘humiliating’ use of tattoo on album cover
A federal judge in Santa Ana, California, has refused to dismiss a lawsuit alleging that a man’s distinctive back tattoo was used without his permission in a sexual picture on an album cover by rapper Cardi B.
On World AIDS Day, 9 organizations receive HIV Legal Services Fund grants
The ABA’s HIV/AIDS Impact Project announced Tuesday, on World AIDS Day, that nine organizations will receive grants of up to $150,000 each to improve the availability of HIV legal services in underserved areas across the country.
Afternoon Briefs: Trump campaign eschews conspiracy-minded lawyer; New Jersey law protects judges’ privacy

Trump campaign distances from lawyer Sidney Powell

The Trump campaign has distanced itself from lawyer Sidney Powell after she made unsupported claims that voting machines had been rigged and Republican…

Afternoon Briefs: District attorney is accused of plotting truck theft; husband and wife lawyers sue over gun photo

District attorney is accused of hiring his kids, conspiring to steal truck

Lee County, Alabama, District Attorney Brandon Hughes has been charged with illegally hiring his children and lying to…

4 Alabama justices urge SCOTUS to overturn Roe v. Wade
The Roe v. Wade ruling finding a constitutional right to abortion was “pulled out of thin air,” according to four Alabama justices who used a special concurrence to urge the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the opinion.
Afternoon Briefs: Lawyer says he was stopped for jogging while Black; public defender held in contempt

Lawyer says he was racially profiled while jogging

A Black lawyer says he was racially profiled during a late-night jog in his new gated community in Parkland, Florida. Lawyer Josiah…

As SCOTUS confirmation hearing ends, a ‘well qualified’ Barrett avoids controversy and opinions
U.S. Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett remained unflappable during her confirmation hearing this week, as she politely deflected questions about her views on cases establishing rights to abortion and same-sex marriage.
‘I hope that you aren’t suggesting that I don’t have my own mind,’ Barrett tells senator
Judge Amy Coney Barrett, the U.S. Supreme Court nominee, pushed back Wednesday when Democratic Sen. Christopher Coons of Delaware contrasted decisions of the late Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Antonin Scalia.
An attack on a judge’s family is putting judicial security center stage

After a gunman opened fire at Judge Esther Salas’ suburban New Jersey home in July, killing her 20-year-old son, she made an emotional plea. But she isn’t the only one sounding the alarm and asking for greater protections and privacy for jurists. Others in the federal judiciary are taking another look at privacy protections and security at judges’ homes.

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