Privacy Law

1111 ABA Journal Privacy Law articles.

Supreme Court strikes down exception to a ban on robocalls, citing First Amendment concerns
The U.S. Supreme Court has struck down an exception to a federal ban on robocalls because it impermissibly favors one type of speech over others.
Afternoon Briefs: Oklahoma top court won’t block Trump rally; cop union loses bid to destroy records

Oklahoma’s top court refuses to block Trump rally

The Oklahoma Supreme Court refused to block a campaign rally Friday for President Donald Trump that is scheduled for Saturday in Tulsa,…

Afternoon Briefs: AG Barr sees lack of confidence in justice system; will students reconsider law school?

AG Barr says ‘witches’ brew’ of extremist groups caused violence

U.S. Attorney General William Barr said at a press conference Thursday that many African Americans lack confidence in the American…

Nearly 300 federal suits stem from pandemic; 101 ‘business interruption’ cases filed; what’s next?
Nearly 300 federal lawsuits filed in the months of March and April stem from the COVID-19 pandemic, a number that is likely to continue to expand.
Privacy and accuracy concerns about remote temperature screening raised by ACLU
Devices designed to measure a person’s temperature from afar have been touted as a way to reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus. But the claims may be unrealistic, according to the American Civil Liberties Union.
Afternoon Briefs: Over 2,100 ex-prosecutors call for AG Barr’s resignation; ‘patient zero’ lawyer tells his story

AG Barr should resign, say former DOJ officials

U.S. Attorney General William Barr should resign, according to an open letter signed by more than 2,100 former Justice Department officials. The…

Contact-tracing apps could help contain COVID-19 but raise thorny legal and privacy issues

Contract-tracing apps have been proposed as one of the tools to help combat the spread of COVID-19. But some are concerned the apps could violate privacy rights and civil liberties; criminals and foreign adversaries could use them to harvest data; and the technology might linger long after the pandemic is over.

Afternoon Briefs: Congress asked for COVID-19 lawsuit curbs; law school cuts pay for staff and faculty

Lobbyists seek COVID-19 lawsuit curbs

Lobbying groups for U.S. businesses are asking Congress to curb liability for companies that could face lawsuits in connection with COVID-19. The U.S. Chamber of…

Pandemic power plays: Civil liberties in the time of COVID-19

The power to respond to a public health crisis exists in the U.S. Constitution, state constitutions, regulations and case law. But the way they fit together is not always clear, especially in the wake of a modern-day global crisis.

Afternoon Briefs: Sick lawyer is back at work after speakerphone mistrial; judge tosses Twitter suit

Lawyer who tried to question witness by speakerphone recovers from COVID-19

An ill lawyer who tried to continue with a trial via a courthouse speakerphone, despite a fever and…

SCOTUS will decide whether computer fraud law applies to cop’s unauthorized database search
The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act applies to a police officer’s unauthorized search of a license place database.
Another lawsuit is filed against Zoom over alleged privacy problems
Zoom Video Communications has been hit with a new privacy lawsuit alleging that it failed to protect user data from Facebook and LinkedIn.
Afternoon Briefs: Judge orders Michael Avenatti’s release; ATL founder David Lat stresses importance of ventilators

Judge orders release of Michael Avenatti because of COVID-19 outbreak

Michael Avenatti, the former lawyer of adult film actress Stormy Daniels, will be released from jail for 90 days because…

SCOTUS rules traffic stop justified after check showed truck owner had revoked license
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that an officer had reasonable suspicion to make a traffic stop after a registration check showed the owner had a revoked driver’s license.
Afternoon Briefs: Seyfarth withdraws after controversial filing; law firm scammer seeks release

Seyfarth Shaw withdraws from suit after controversial argument

Seyfarth Shaw is seeking to withdraw from representing the U.S. Soccer Federation in an equal-pay case after a controversial court filing.…

Read more ...




Web First
How the Washington Supreme Court's LLLT program met its demise
Original reporting ...
Topics: Career & Practice
Afternoon Briefs: Deloitte unveils legal services unit; forensic botanist as crime solver
Complete list of topics ...


Your Voice
Why Generation Z isn't the feared 'zombie' generation
Articles and commentary ...
Podcasts
COVID-19 hasn't stopped this lawyer from advocating for wellness and recovery
More podcasts ...