Privacy Law

1114 ABA Journal Privacy Law articles.

Afternoon Briefs: Judge orders Michael Avenatti’s release; ATL founder David Lat stresses importance of ventilators

Judge orders release of Michael Avenatti because of COVID-19 outbreak

Michael Avenatti, the former lawyer of adult film actress Stormy Daniels, will be released from jail for 90 days because…

SCOTUS rules traffic stop justified after check showed truck owner had revoked license
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that an officer had reasonable suspicion to make a traffic stop after a registration check showed the owner had a revoked driver’s license.
Afternoon Briefs: Seyfarth withdraws after controversial filing; law firm scammer seeks release

Seyfarth Shaw withdraws from suit after controversial argument

Seyfarth Shaw is seeking to withdraw from representing the U.S. Soccer Federation in an equal-pay case after a controversial court filing.…

Afternoon Briefs: Athletes aim for law school; lawsuits target Zoom over Facebook sharing

Pro basketball players shoot for law school

Imani McGee-Stafford, a center with the Dallas Wings, is leaving the basketball court and headed to the Southwestern Law School in Los Angeles.…

Gunshot detection technology company voluntarily submitted itself for an audit after privacy concerns

Believing concerns that its microphones could allow for eavesdropping on private conversations were largely because of a misunderstanding of the product, ShotSpotter did something radical: It opened itself up to an independent privacy audit conducted by the Policing Project at the New York University School of Law.

Amazon’s Ring doorbell cameras may help deter package thefts, but critics worry about overreach

According to the New York Times, more than 90,000 packages a day are stolen or disappear without explanation in New York City alone, up about 20% from four years ago.

FBI secret wiretap applications had errors and made assertions lacking factual backup, audit says
FBI secret surveillance applications contained errors and assertions that were not backed up by required documentation, according to findings of an audit by the U.S. Department of Justice’s inspector general.
After jail recorded hundreds of attorney-client calls, inmate wins release
Many phone calls between Orange County, California, jail inmates and their lawyers were recorded by an outside vendor, and sheriff's personnel listened to some of the communications, according to a motion this week signed by the county public defender.
How to plan ahead for compliance and privacy projections

As general counsel at Checkr, one of the most interesting challenges I face is staying on top of the ever-changing laws and regulations in the background check industry and…

Afternoon Briefs: SCOTUS splits over immigrant’s fight against ID theft conviction; first black justice on top Illinois court dies

SCOTUS splits over undocumented immigrant’s fight against state identify theft conviction

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 on Tuesday against Ramiro Garcia, an unauthorized immigrant in Kansas who was convicted…

State supreme court rules for man charged with theft for removing GPS planted on his car by cops
The Indiana Supreme Court ruled Thursday for an Indiana man who was charged with theft for allegedly removing a GPS tracking device from his vehicle that had been planted there by officers.
ABA House of Delegates passes resolution on drones; delegate calls it ‘a hot topic’
The ABA will address the growing presence of drones in American airspace by lobbying for regulations that would help prevent operators of the unmanned aircraft from trespassing on private property.
Judge who sealed documents about her beach property gets reversed by appeals court
A Connecticut appeals court has vacated a judge’s order sealing two documents about a beach property that she owned in Maine after a law professor stepped in to argue for their release.
Afternoon Briefs: Equifax hack traced to Chinese military; law prof is under coronavirus quarantine

Chinese military personnel are charged in Equifax hack

Four members of the Chinese military have been indicted in the 2017 hacking of Equifax that gathered names, birth dates and Social…

3rd Circuit orders release of ex-cop who wouldn’t unlock hard drives, cites cap on civil contempt detention
A federal appeals court has ordered the released of a former Philadelphia police officer who spent more than four years in prison because he didn’t comply with a court order to provide hard drive passwords.

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