Privacy Law

1136 ABA Journal Privacy Law articles.

‘I hope that you aren’t suggesting that I don’t have my own mind,’ Barrett tells senator
Judge Amy Coney Barrett, the U.S. Supreme Court nominee, pushed back Wednesday when Democratic Sen. Christopher Coons of Delaware contrasted decisions of the late Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Antonin Scalia.
An attack on a judge’s family is putting judicial security center stage

After a gunman opened fire at Judge Esther Salas’ suburban New Jersey home in July, killing her 20-year-old son, she made an emotional plea. But she isn’t the only one sounding the alarm and asking for greater protections and privacy for jurists. Others in the federal judiciary are taking another look at privacy protections and security at judges’ homes.

9th Circuit says surveillance program exposed by Snowden was illegal but upholds convictions
A federal appeals court said Wednesday the massive phone data collection program revealed by whistleblower Edward Snowden, who copied and leaked classified information from the National Security Agency in 2013 when he was a CIA employee and subcontractor, violated federal law and possibly the Fourth Amendment.
Employee urine samples taken by ‘direct observation method’ don’t invade privacy, state supreme court rules
The Ohio Supreme Court ruled 4-3 on Wednesday that an employee can’t sue for invasion of privacy when an employer uses the “direct observation method” to collect a urine sample for drug testing.
8th Circuit rules against grand juror who wanted to talk about Michael Brown case
A federal appeals court has ruled against a grand juror who wanted to correct the record after a prosecutor discussed evidence in the 2014 fatal shooting of Michael Brown, an 18-year-old Black man, by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri.
Afternoon Briefs: Actor Jussie Smollett’s prosecutors are reviewed; enhanced protection is recommended for judges

No crimes by prosecutors found in Jussie Smollett case

Special prosecutor Dan Webb has found “substantial abuses of discretion” but no criminal wrongdoing by prosecutors who dropped charges against actor…

Macy’s uses facial recognition software to identify customers on security cameras, lawsuit claims
A would-be class action lawsuit alleges that the Macy’s department store chain violates Illinois law when it identifies customers recorded on its surveillance cameras by using facial recognition software.
New Jersey federal judge: ‘Monster’ who killed my son had dossier on us; we need judicial privacy
Federal judges should not have to live in fear, U.S. District Judge Esther Salas of the District of New Jersey said in a video statement Monday.
Would a government-backed social credit scoring system like China’s ever fly in the US?
US brief opposes lawyer who objected to border searches of his cellphone
The federal government is opposing a Texas immigration lawyer’s request for an injunction to prevent warrantless border searches of his electronic devices.
Supreme Court strikes down exception to a ban on robocalls, citing First Amendment concerns
The U.S. Supreme Court has struck down an exception to a federal ban on robocalls because it impermissibly favors one type of speech over others.
Afternoon Briefs: Oklahoma top court won’t block Trump rally; cop union loses bid to destroy records

Oklahoma’s top court refuses to block Trump rally

The Oklahoma Supreme Court refused to block a campaign rally Friday for President Donald Trump that is scheduled for Saturday in Tulsa,…

Afternoon Briefs: AG Barr sees lack of confidence in justice system; will students reconsider law school?

AG Barr says ‘witches’ brew’ of extremist groups caused violence

U.S. Attorney General William Barr said at a press conference Thursday that many African Americans lack confidence in the American…

Nearly 300 federal suits stem from pandemic; 101 ‘business interruption’ cases filed; what’s next?
Nearly 300 federal lawsuits filed in the months of March and April stem from the COVID-19 pandemic, a number that is likely to continue to expand.
Privacy and accuracy concerns about remote temperature screening raised by ACLU
Devices designed to measure a person’s temperature from afar have been touted as a way to reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus. But the claims may be unrealistic, according to the American Civil Liberties Union.

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