ABA Journal

Public Interest

3051 ABA Journal Public Interest articles.

Disinformation and the safety of election officials must be addressed, ABA House says

The House of Delegates overwhelmingly approved a measure combating election misinformation and disinformation and protecting the personal security of election administrators and voters at the ABA Annual Meeting on Monday.

New York is first state to require CLE course in cybersecurity

Lawyers in New York will have to take at least a one-hour cybersecurity course as part of their continuing legal education requirements beginning in July 2023.

Weekly Briefs: Embryos can be tax dependents; top state court upholds mail voting

Georgia allows embryos to be claimed as dependents

Embryos with a “detectable human heartbeat” can be claimed as dependents on state income tax returns in Georgia. The Georgia Department of…

Florida governor suspends ‘woke’ elected prosecutor, citing pledges on transgender care, abortion

Republican Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said Thursday he was suspending the elected state attorney in Hillsborough County, Florida, for “woke” positions on abortion and transgender medical care.

Thanks to civics teacher’s efforts, last convicted witch in Massachusetts is exonerated

An eighth grade civics teacher, working with her students, helped win the exoneration of the last convicted witch in Massachusetts.

Federal charges filed against 4 Kentucky officers in raid that led to Breonna Taylor’s death

Four current and former Louisville, Kentucky, police officers have been charged with federal crimes in connection with the 2020 police raid that led to the shooting death of Breonna Taylor.

Military can court-martial reservists with ‘de facto retirement status,’ federal appeals court says

A federal appeals court has held that Congress did not exceed its constitutional authority when it allowed court-martial jurisdiction over a service member who was retired from active duty and working as a civilian employee.

ProBAR lawyer recalls immigration tent hearings in Texas

“Today, I have to make an impact in front of the judge,” the Venezuelan asylum-seeker told me at the tent court in Brownsville, Texas. This was just a few minutes before his hearing in front of the immigration judge who would be appearing remotely on a monitor inside the tent court.

Clergy members contend Florida abortion law violates their religious freedom; 5 suits are filed

Seven clergy members have filed five lawsuits in Florida contending that the state’s abortion restrictions burden their religious beliefs, speech and conduct.

2nd Circuit partly rules for jury-nullification advocate challenging limit on protests near courthouses

A jury-nullification protester wasn’t able to persuade a federal appeals court that a New York law banning some protests near courthouses is unconstitutional on its face.

ABA amicus brief asks Supreme Court to uphold use of race-conscious admissions policies

The U.S. Supreme Court should uphold Grutter v. Bollinger, its decision from 2003 that allowed colleges and universities to use race as one factor in admissions decisions, the ABA said in an amicus brief filed Monday.

Attorneys advocate for cancer patients and their caregivers through longtime ABA project

“When you take on something like a law degree or a medical degree, there is an obligation to help someone other than yourself,” says Eunice Aikins-Afful, a clinical research project manager at BeiGene, a biotechnology company in Cambridge, Massachusetts. “We’re blessed to be able to do what we do, and then turn it around to someone who can’t do it for themselves. And it doesn’t have to be altruistic and fancy. It can simply just be answering a question.”

Forced Labor?

For decades, activists have been challenging what has become a widespread policy of paying little to nothing for work done by immigrant detainees. The October 2021 verdict in Nwauzor v. the GEO Group has been hailed as not just a success story but also a potential game changer for a practice advocates say violates civil rights.

Going Viral: Once unpopular, QR codes have taken off, thanks to the pandemic

When the pandemic hit, QR codes became very popular as people looked for a contact-free way to share information. Privacy advocates, however, see a darker side to QR codes.

Avoiding Unlawful Client Solicitation: Attorneys must ensure subordinates know the dos and don’ts

Most attorneys understand they must refrain from improper solicitation of potential clients for pecuniary gain, but a new formal opinion clarifies that practitioners must go even further. Beyond their own actions, lawyers are obligated to train their employees to avoid similarly unlawful solicitous behavior.

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