ABA Journal

Public Interest

3270 ABA Journal Public Interest articles.

Is designer’s refusal to create website for same-sex wedding free speech or illegal discrimination?

The case of 303 Creative v. Elenis is about whether the Colorado Anti-Discrimination Act violates the First Amendment free speech rights of Lorie Smith and her wholly owned design firm.

Chemerinsky: An important week of arguments in the Supreme Court

Next Monday and Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in two of the most important cases of the term. Each could have enormous implications for future litigation and for constitutional law.

Aftershocks: Navigating the morass of state abortion laws post-Roe

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports nearly 3 million women in the U.S. have experienced a rape-related pregnancy. Still, abortion opponents are making it increasingly difficult for women who are victimized by rape or incest and who may become pregnant as a result to access the medical care they need, when they need it.

Our Civic Sacrament: Voting and the people who make the process work must be protected and respected

The American Bar Association is committed to fixing this growing problem of the erosion of election confidence. Through its Standing Committee on Election Law, the ABA, in a nonpartisan fashion, examines ways to improve the federal electoral process to permit the broadest, least restrictive access for all eligible Americans to the ballot box and to ensure all votes are counted.

State laws targeting social media platforms face First Amendment challenges

ABA President Deborah Enix-Ross says she’ll focus on civics, civility and collaboration

Deborah Enix-Ross sat down spoke with the ABA Journal for a Q&A about her plans for her year as the ABA president.

7th Circuit rejects First Amendment challenge to Indiana fetal-remains law

A federal appeals court has rejected a First Amendment challenge to an Indiana law requiring abortion providers to dispose of fetal remains by burial or cremation or to give the remains to patients to dispose of as they please.

SCOTUS legal counsel defends Alito dinner with evangelical couple, says leak report is ‘uncorroborated’

The legal counsel for the U.S. Supreme Court is defending Justice Samuel Alito’s ethics following a report from the New York Times alleging that one of the justice's dinner companions later passed along information about the outcome of an upcoming Supreme Court decision to an anti-abortion crusader.

Georgetown Law launches fellowship program to improve public access to courts through technology

The Georgetown University Law Center plans to embed technology experts in state, local and tribal courts in September 2023 through a fellowship program intended to help improve court processes and public access to justice.

Federal appeals court rules for ex-inmate who sued over longtime solitary confinement

A federal appeals court has ruled for a former inmate in Delaware who alleged that his seven-month solitary confinement worsened his schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in violation of the Eighth Amendment.

Former Biden judicial pick faces possible sanctions for alleged ‘countless hours wasted’ in bias case

An assistant New York attorney general who was once nominated for a federal judgeship is defending his litigation decisions after a federal judge ordered him to show cause why he shouldn’t be sanctioned.

Supreme Court will hear Jack Daniel’s appeal over parody dog toy ‘Bad Spaniels’

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether a parody dog toy called “Bad Spaniels” is entitled to protection from trademark infringement and dilution-by-tarnishment claims by Jack Daniel’s Properties Inc.

Meet the two Texas attorneys behind the Children’s Immigration Law Academy

Dalia Castillo-Granados had just begun her fellowship with the St. Frances Cabrini Center for Immigrant Legal Assistance, a program of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston, when she met Yasmin Yavar in 2008.

Top Georgia court reinstates six-week abortion ban

The Georgia Supreme Court on Wednesday allowed enforcement of the state’s ban on most abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy.

Lawyers struggle to make headway with growing immigrant backlog

The virtual courtroom of immigration Judge Thomas Mulligan of New York City’s Varick Street court was not exactly a well-oiled machine on a recent August morning. The judge was occupied with master calendar hearings, the docket where respondents—they would be called “defendants” in other settings—acknowledged and answered the government’s charges.

Read more ...