ABA Journal

Public Interest

2231 ABA Journal Public Interest articles.

Judge pursues criminal charges against 3 US marshals after underling won’t disclose COVID-19 vaccination status

A federal judge in South Dakota has said three supervisory U.S. marshals will face criminal charges after an underling refused to disclose her COVID-19 vaccination status and left the courthouse with three defendants scheduled for court hearings.

Afternoon Briefs: Dechert associate wins ‘Jeopardy!’ and fans’ hearts; judge sides with hospital requiring vaccines

Dechert associate wins over Jeopardy! fans

Dechert associate Julia Markham Cameron won over Jeopardy! fans with her quirky facial expressions during an appearance earlier this month in which she…

Forfeiture of convicted drug dealer’s Land Rover was an excessive fine, state supreme court rules

The Indiana Supreme Court has ruled that a convicted drug dealer who challenged the forfeiture of his Land Rover before the U.S. Supreme Court should get his vehicle back.

Law school overenrollment: A 172 LSAT score may not be what it used to be, according to some

Thanks to an increase in law school applicants coupled with rising Law School Admission Test scores, getting admitted from the waitlist is much less likely this year, and in some cases, there are incentives for incoming 1Ls to defer until 2022.

Florida resident loses First Amendment appeal in suit over rejection of his mansion plans

A federal appeals court has rejected constitutional claims by a Florida resident who sued when a town rejected his plans for a new beachfront mansion that would be dissimilar to nearby homes.

DOJ says it can defend religious exemption that allows LGBTQ discrimination in education

The U.S. Department of Justice is opposing an attempt by Christian colleges to intervene in a lawsuit by asserting that it can defend a religious exemption that allows the schools to discriminate against LGBTQ students.

‘Vice Patrol’ examines how police and courts enforced anti-gay laws before Stonewall

In Vice Patrol: Cops, Courts, and the Struggle Over Urban Gay Life Before Stonewall, author Anna Lvovsky examines the way that queer communities were policed in the 1930s through the 1960s.

Afternoon Briefs: New York City law department hacked; Stanford Law wasn’t involved in fake flyer fracas

New York City law department is hacked

Lawyers in New York City’s law department have no remote access to the the computer system after a computer hack, a spokesperson said…

ACLU is split by internal debate over First Amendment support for hate speech

The American Civil Liberties Union, long known for its support of the First Amendment, is dealing with internal dissension over defense of hate speech.

Judge who appeared determined to avoid mandatory sentence is removed from case

A judge who appeared determined to impose a reduced sentence on a woman who cooperated in a sexual exploitation prosecution has been removed from the case.

Afternoon Briefs: Judge compares AR-15 to Swiss Army knife; suit claims GC wasn’t rehired because of long-haul COVID-19

Federal judge strikes down ban on assault weapons

Citing the Second Amendment, U.S. District Judge Roger Benitez of the Southern District of California struck down California’s ban on assault weapons…

Supreme Court won’t hear challenge to male-only draft; Kavanaugh joins 2 liberal justices in statement on denial

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday turned down a constitutional challenge to the male-only draft that was argued before a federal appeals court by a men’s rights lawyer who was shot and killed outside his home in July 2020.

Making brown-bag meals for the needy helped this law student stay busy and safe during the COVID-19 pandemic

Assembling sandwiches helped recent law school graduate Jacqueline Ingles focus during remote classes, and over the past year she made more than a thousand of them for the Chicago Help Initiative, a nonprofit group that takes food to pantries and free meal sites.

Afternoon Briefs: Legal industry jobs jump again; Boies Schiller emails admissible at former CEO’s trial

Legal industry gains 1,700 jobs in May

The legal services industry gained 1,700 jobs in May, according to seasonally adjusted numbers released Friday by U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The…

In New York, a 7-year-old is arrested for rape; should the age for juvenile prosecutions be raised?

Children in New York can be charged as juvenile delinquents beginning at age 7, which explains why a boy of that age could be charged with rape in March in upstate Brasher Falls, New York.

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