ABA Journal

Public Interest

3049 ABA Journal Public Interest articles.

Weekly Briefs: Go-between sentenced in law prof’s murder; $4.25B opioid settlement announced

Convicted go-between gets life sentence in law prof’s murder

Katherine Magbanua was sentenced Friday to life in prison without parole for acting as the go-between in the murder of…

Sporting a new beard, Justice Alito defends abortion decision, remarks on ‘growing hostility to religion’

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito is getting some attention for a recent speech and a new look—a beard described as “a work in progress” at the Volokh Conspiracy blog.

Justice Thomas told GW Law he is ‘unavailable’ to teach constitutional law seminar after student outcry

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas won’t be teaching a constitutional law seminar at the George Washington University Law School after thousands of students asked the school to oust him.

Sleepwalking employee who got into next-door colleague’s hotel bed isn’t protected by disability law, 5th Circuit rules

An employee who was fired after sleepwalking into her colleague’s bed in a next-door hotel room is not protected by disability law, a federal appeals court has ruled.

Judge on top New York court is now ‘ready and eager’ to get vaccinated; is chief judge vacancy a factor?

A judge on New York’s top court has announced a change in vaccination plans after being banned from the courthouse because of her refusal to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

Will Trump face federal indictment? Garland says DOJ pursues justice ‘without fear or favor’

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland didn’t say whether he would prosecute former President Donald Trump in an interview with NBC Nightly News anchor Lester Holt on Tuesday.

After collaborating with bestselling author, judge discusses new solo book

After several collaborations with bestselling author James Patterson, Judge David Ellis of Illinois, a prolific novelist, decided to go it alone for his latest book, Look Closer.

Law firms aiding staffers to secure abortions in post-Dobbs world see possible risks and rewards

As America’s culture wars intensify, the post-Roe landscape is possibly an even hotter legal battlespace than any seen before. As some law firms moved to help employees with reproductive health aid, blowback was swift from politicians hostile to abortion rights, with some even threatening to disbar those firm’s lawyers.

5th Circuit rules against children with disabilities who challenged Texas’ ban on school mask mandates

A federal appeals court on Monday ruled that children with disabilities had no standing to challenge a ban on school mask mandates in Texas because they hadn’t shown that a favorable decision would redress their injuries.

South Carolina bill would ban internet information on abortions; tech companies may face competing laws

Technology companies could face a “disparate patchwork” of laws regulating abortion information in the aftermath of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision overturning Roe v. Wade, according to the Washington Post.

Using Texas’ abortion law playbook, California allows private suits over sales of banned weapons

Democratic California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill Friday that allows private parties to sue anyone who imports, makes, sells or distributes weapons banned for sale in California.

Traci Feit Love continues to deliver pro bono services while negotiating through the trauma and injustices she witnesses

Lawyers have been organizing in large numbers during the last six years to offer pro bono legal services to immigrants, racial minorities and small businesses affected by COVID-19. The new post-Roe landscape is no different.

Licensed paralegals program in Oregon gets final approval

The Oregon Supreme Court has given final approval to a program that allows licensed paralegals to provide limited legal services in family law and landlord-tenant cases.

Following her experiences, former law clerk seeks support for the Judiciary Accountability Act

Aliza Shatzman didn’t realize that federal judicial employees are not protected by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. That is until the judge she worked for in 2020 ended her clerkship early—for reasons that she thinks were due to gender discrimination.

Kagan sees danger to democracy if Supreme Court ‘loses all connection’ with public sentiment

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan warned Thursday that it would be dangerous if the Supreme Court loses touch with public sentiment or appears to be implementing political preferences.

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