ABA Journal

Public Interest

2512 ABA Journal Public Interest articles.

How SCOTUS enabled police abuses of civil rights⁠—and what we can do about it

Much has been said about police officers and departments who violate civil rights or enforce the law in discriminatory ways. But not as much attention has been paid to the ways in which the U.S. Supreme Court has enabled police excesses and insulated police from civil or criminal responsibility, says Erwin Chemerinsky, the dean of the University of California at Berkeley School of Law and author of the new book Presumed Guilty: How the Supreme Court Empowered the Police and Subverted Civil Rights.

Does executive privilege still protect Trump after his term ends? Fight brews over congressional subpoenas

Former President Donald Trump is asserting executive privilege to fight a request for presidential records sought by the House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot. Can he do that after his presidential term ends?

Transgender lawyer sues for declaration that bias based on gender identity violates attorney ethics rules

Transgender lawyer Sheryl Ring has filed a lawsuit seeking a declaration that attorney ethics rules in Illinois do not allow discrimination based on gender identity.

After appeals court revives Texas abortion law, docs could be liable for abortions performed in prior 2 days

A federal appeals court on Friday temporarily revived Texas’ restrictive abortion law, raising the possibility that abortion providers could be sued for any procedures performed in a two-day window when the law was blocked.

CEO of Alliance Defending Freedom had circulated proposed suit seeking to overturn election

The president and CEO of a conservative Christian legal group played a behind-the-scenes role in a lawsuit filed by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton in a bid to overturn…

6th Circuit rules for student athletes denied religious exemption from vaccine mandate

Sixteen student athletes at Western Michigan University who were denied a religious exemption from a vaccine mandate will likely succeed in their lawsuit, a federal appeals court has ruled.

Are government bans on the teaching of critical race theory unconstitutional?

According to recent reports, local legislators have enacted bills in eight states banning the teaching of critical race theory in public schools, colleges and universities. Similar measures have been or soon will be introduced in 20 more.

Federal judge who blocked Texas abortion law cites these reasons for US standing to sue

The federal government has standing to sue over Texas’ restriction abortion law, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, when he blocked the law as “flagrantly unconstitutional.”

California’s ban on private prisons unconstitutionally interferes with immigration enforcement, 9th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court has ruled that a ban on private prisons in California unconstitutionally restricts the federal government’s authority to operate private detention facilities in the state.

Judge on top New York court is reportedly banned from courthouse after refusing to reveal COVID-19 vaccine status

Just one judge in New York’s court system has refused to comply with the state’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate.

Litigants claiming GEICO auto policy covers STD from car sex can’t proceed anonymously, judge rules

A car owner and his sexual partner can’t keep their names secret in litigation over their claim that GEICO’s auto and umbrella policies cover damages for a sexually transmitted disease contracted during sex in the insured car.

Qualified immunity doesn’t protect officer who killed man threatening only himself, Sotomayor says

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor dissented Monday, when the high court declined to consider whether qualified immunity should protect a police officer who fatally shot a man holding a gun to his own temple.

University of Montana faces Title IX complaints, including from law students

Following a Title IX lawsuit brought by former administrators and a current professor at the University of Montana, law students at the school claim they were dissuaded from filing administrative complaints alleging repeated use of slurs in the classroom and sexual misconduct.

Supreme Court will consider Sen. Cruz’s challenge to campaign loan restrictions

The U.S. Supreme Court will consider a First Amendment challenge to a campaign finance law that restricts repayment of candidates’ personal loans to their campaigns.

Sotomayor refuses to block vaccine mandate for New York City school employees

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor on Friday refused to block a vaccine requirement for employees of New York City schools.

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