ABA Journal

Trials & Litigation

19388 ABA Journal Trials & Litigation articles.

Should federal officers get immunity for lies and beatings? SCOTUS is asked to decide

Three cert petitions ask the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal law enforcement officers and those who serve with them on joint task forces were not entitled to absolute immunity for violating constitutional rights of three people.

Do lawyers make simple things difficult?

Are we windbags? Do we waste too much time on trivialities?

Day Pitney lawyers for gunmaker seek report cards, disciplinary records of slain Sandy Hook children

Updated: Day Pitney is raising eyebrows for subpoenas seeking academic, attendance and disciplinary records of five slain Sandy Hook schoolchildren as it defends a lawsuit against gunmaker Remington Arms Co.

Judge accused of eating evidence apparently kills himself before FBI agents enter home for arrest

A Maryland judge facing a federal charge of child exploitation apparently killed himself before FBI agents entered his home to arrest him Friday.

Weekly Briefs: ABA president remembers 9/11; female judges in Afghanistan live in fear

ABA president calls for spirit of cooperation in Sept. 11 statement

The ABA joins all of America in remembering the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, said…

Jenner & Block settles with landlord in dispute over rent payments during pandemic

Jenner & Block has settled a rent dispute with the landlord for its Chicago building that stemmed from unused office space during the COVID-19 pandemic.

DOJ sues to block Texas abortion law, cites conflict with federal constitutional duties

The U.S. Department of Justice sued the state of Texas on Thursday in a bid to block its law that bans abortions at about six weeks of pregnancy.

Litigator calls ‘trickery’ allegations ‘ludicrous’ in spat with NFL team’s ex-general counsel

The litigator who led a National Football League investigation into sexual harassment at the Washington Football Team is denying a claim by the team’s general counsel that she used “trickery” to learn the details of a 2009 confidential settlement, according to redacted legal filings unsealed Wednesday.

Supreme Court will resume in-person oral arguments, but the public can’t attend

The U.S. Supreme Court announced Wednesday that it will resume in-person oral arguments when its term begins Oct. 4, but members of the public will not be allowed to be there.

John Pierce, lawyer for Jan. 6 Capitol riot defendants, is planning his return

After being described as missing in action by federal prosecutors, John Pierce, who represents many Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riots defendants, told the court in Wednesday filings that he expects to be “fully operational” sometime next week.

Agreement giving lawyers ‘sole discretion’ to settle client’s case violates ethics rules, appeals court says

A California appeals court has voided a provision in a contingent-fee agreement that gave personal injury lawyers the “sole discretion” to settle a client’s case.

DOJ explores ways to challenge Texas abortion law; judge grants TRO against anti-abortion group

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland has said the U.S. Department of Justice will use a federal law to protect the safety of women seeking abortions in Texas as the department “urgently explores all options” to challenge a law restricting abortions in the state.

Limit on food distribution to homeless people in parks violates First Amendment, 11th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court on Tuesday sided with a nonprofit organization that provides free food to homeless people in a park in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, finding that a city rule that limits the practice is unconstitutional.

9th Circuit orders lower court to review decision over accessibility at baseball stadium

A federal appeals court on Wednesday ruled in favor of plaintiffs who alleged that spectators using wheelchairs at T-Mobile Park, the home of the Seattle Mariners Major League Baseball team, had inadequate sightlines under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Judge approves Purdue Pharma bankruptcy plan that provides immunity to Sackler family members

A federal bankruptcy judge conditionally approved on Wednesday a settlement that dissolves Purdue Pharma and directs the company’s owners, members of the Sackler family, to turn over $4.5 billion through roughly the next decade.

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