ABA Journal

U.S. Supreme Court

5695 ABA Journal U.S. Supreme Court articles.

Does legal recruiting career of chief justice’s wife create ethics issues? Critic sends details of her pay to Congress

A former legal recruiter who sued over his firing is alleging that the paychecks earned by his former colleague and lawsuit defendant, Jane Sullivan Roberts, raise ethics issues for her husband, Chief Justice John Roberts.

Chemerinsky: When can state governments sue the United States?

A recurring issue before the Supreme Court this term, including in two cases to be argued in the next month, concerns when state governments have standing to sue the United States. Over the last decade, there has been an explosion of such suits.

ChatGPT is asked 50 questions about Supreme Court; it got only 21 questions right

SCOTUSblog has no worries that its coverage of the Supreme Court will be displaced by the artificial intelligence program known as ChatGPT.

Judicial discretion should be upheld in case involving sentencing standards, ABA says in amicus brief

The ABA has filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court to support the argument that federal criminal statutes do not require a New York defendant who was convicted for his role in a murder related to drug trafficking to be sentenced to mandatory consecutive sentences.

New tips surface after Kavanaugh documentary is unveiled at Sundance

Documentary filmmakers plan to add new information to their film about allegations of sexual misconduct against U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh after receiving new tips during the 2023 Sundance Film Festival.

$2.1M IRS civil penalty for unreported Swiss bank account merits SCOTUS review, Gorsuch argues

Justice Neil Gorsuch argued Monday that the U.S. Supreme Court should have agreed to hear the case of a woman who argued that the Internal Revenue Service violated the excessive fines clause when it required her to pay a $2.1 million civil penalty for failing to report a Swiss bank account.

SCOTUS justices were questioned but not implicated in Dobbs leak probe; some are concerned about double standard

Investigators questioned U.S. Supreme Court justices as they probed the leak of a draft opinion overturning the right to abortion, but the justices were not required to sign affidavits, the official who oversaw the probe said Friday.

Weekly Briefs: SCOTUS sets a record; CUNY law student goes missing

Still no SCOTUS opinions in argued cases

The U.S. Supreme Court has set a record by failing to issue opinions in argued cases this term. Usually, the high court issues…

Who leaked Dobbs? SCOTUS investigators don’t know, despite 97 employee interviews and forensic sleuthing

The U.S. Supreme Court can’t identify who leaked Justice Samuel Alito’s draft opinion overturning the right to abortion to Politico in May 2022, according to a report released Thursday.

Law prof stirs controversy with tweet calling Scalia ‘basically a klansman’

Updated: A professor at the Emory University School of Law is under fire after he tweeted that the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia was “basically a klansman.”

Supreme Court will hear case of convicted stalker to decide mental state needed for ‘true threats’ conviction

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to consider what kind of mental state a speaker must have to be convicted for “true threats” that aren’t protected by the First Amendment.

Can the government seize property for unpaid taxes and keep the surplus after selling it? SCOTUS will decide

The U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether local governments violate the Constitution when they seize property for unpaid taxes, sell it and then fail to return the surplus to the owner.

Supreme Court considers Title VII accommodation for Christian postal worker who wouldn’t work on Sundays

The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to decide the case of a Christian postal worker who quit his job after he was disciplined for refusing to work on Sundays for religious reasons.

Supreme Court leaves in place New York gun restrictions during appeals

New York’s new concealed-carry restrictions remain in place during appeals as a result of an order Wednesday by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Law firm’s more protective test for attorney-client privilege ‘is a big ask,’ Kagan says

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan told a lawyer representing a tax law firm Monday that his proposed expansive test for protecting documents under attorney-client privilege “is a big ask,” according to coverage of the oral arguments.

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