U.S. Supreme Court

4744 ABA Journal U.S. Supreme Court articles.

2 SCOTUS justices agree to amend financial disclosures after Fix the Court asks questions
U.S. Supreme Court Justices Clarence Thomas and Sonia Sotomayor agreed to amend their financial disclosure forms after the court transparency group Fix the Court raised questions about their apparent failure to list some reimbursements for a few their trips.
Afternoon Briefs: Lawsuits challenge shutdown orders; judge ordered to stop hearings

Suits challenging shutdown orders fail in two states

Lawsuits challenging shutdown orders in Pennsylvania and New Hampshire have so far been unsuccessful.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Sunday denied a…

SCOTUS rules states have immunity from copyright suits in case involving Blackbeard’s ship

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that states have sovereign immunity from lawsuits alleging copyright infringement.

Congress did not have the authority to eliminate that immunity when it passed the…

Supreme Court rules suits for contracting bias must show but-for causation, a tougher standard

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that lawsuits alleging discrimination in contracts under a Reconstruction-era law have to show but-for causation.

The Supreme Court ruled unanimously in the case…

Traditional insanity defense isn’t constitutionally required, SCOTUS rules
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that the due process clause doesn’t require states to offer a traditional insanity defense based on a defendant’s inability to distinguish right from wrong.
Will Supreme Court decide some cases without oral arguments?
The U.S. Supreme Court has already delayed 11 oral arguments for its March sitting. Nine arguments are scheduled for April, and it’s possible the court will postpone those, too.
SCOTUS extends filing deadlines because of coronavirus outbreak
The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday extended filing deadlines for cert petitions because of the COVID-19 outbreak.
Outbreaks of disease have shuttered the Supreme Court going back more than 2 centuries

When the U.S. Supreme Court announced this week that its March sitting of oral arguments would be postponed “in keeping with public health precautions recommended in response to COVID-19,” the statement included some historical references for support—going back as far as 227 years ago.

SCOTUS delays arguments while other courts suspend trials or close over COVID-19 concerns
The U.S. Supreme Court announced Monday that it will delay oral arguments as other courts were delaying trials or even closing in response to concerns about the new coronavirus.
SCOTUS allows remain-in-Mexico policy to continue during legal challenge
The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday allowed the Trump administration to continue to require asylum seekers to remain in Mexico while their cases are pending.
Federal judge calls Chief Justice Roberts ‘masterpiece of disingenuousness’ in law review article
A federal judge appointed by President Bill Clinton is criticizing the U.S. Supreme Court’s conservative majority for “undermining American democracy” by weakening the Voting Rights Act, failing to rein in partisan gerrymandering, and increasing the economic and political power of corporations.
Afternoon Briefs: Jim Bakker warned about COVID-19 claims; Reed Smith widow loses in 7th Circuit

Televangelist told to stop peddling COVID-19 elixir

Two state attorneys general and two federal agencies are trying to stop televangelist Jim Bakker from peddling a supplement called Silver Solution as…

Afternoon Briefs: Supreme Court to hear juvenile sentencing case; Led Zeppelin wins ‘Stairway’ fight

Supreme Court takes another case over juvenile life-without-parole sentences

The Supreme Court agreed on Monday to determine if the Eighth Amendment’s ban on cruel and unusual punishment requires the court…

‘Remain in Mexico’ policy allowed to continue pending Supreme Court review, 9th Circuit says
On Wednesday, a federal appeals court granted the Trump administration’s request to allow the “remain in Mexico” policy to stay in effect while also reaffirming that it ruled correctly when it deemed the policy to be unlawful last week.
SCOTUS chief justice rebukes Senate’s top Democrat for warning justices will ‘pay the price’
In an unusual move, U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. chastised Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer for remarks he made about President Donald Trump’s two nominees to the high court during a rally Wednesday.

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