ABA Journal

U.S. Supreme Court

5278 ABA Journal U.S. Supreme Court articles.

New York and other states have the right to limit concealed weapon permits, ABA says in amicus brief

State and local governments have long had the right to tailor firearm regulations to their own judgments about how best to protect public health and safety, the ABA told the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday.

Supreme Court’s new hybrid argument format allows justices to continue taking turns

When the U.S. Supreme Court resumes in-person oral arguments Oct. 4, it won’t return to the pre-pandemic questioning format.

ABA’s inaugural Equity Summit will highlight importance of inclusion; guests include Justice Sotomayor

Throughout the summit’s four days of programming, registrants can attend five CLE programs; four TED-style talks; three workshops on critical diversity equity and inclusion issues; and a fireside discussion Sept. 29 with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

Supreme Court should uphold precedent in Mississippi abortion case, ABA amicus brief says

The ABA filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday that asks justices to uphold Roe v. Wade and adhere to its precedent recognizing the right to an abortion prior to the viability of the fetus when it hears a case scheduled for the October term.

Justice Thomas says media jeopardizes faith in legal institutions by equating decisions with personal views

Justice Clarence Thomas echoed recent comments by two other Supreme Court justices on Thursday when he criticized media reports that appear to suggest judges make decisions based on personal views.

Only 37% of US voters approve of Supreme Court’s handling of its job, poll finds

The U.S. Supreme Court’s approval rating has dropped to its lowest point since pollsters at Quinnipiac University began surveys on the question in 2004.

Only 37% of registered voters approve…

Dershowitz: Texas abortion bounty approach could be adopted in states that want to ban handgun ownership

Alan Dershowitz, a professor emeritus at Harvard Law School, is suggesting a political response to the Texas abortion law that offers $10,000 to private citizens who sue those who help secure abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy.

9th Circuit nominee is grilled over statement calling Kavanaugh ‘intellectually and morally bankrupt’

A nominee to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at San Francisco told members of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday that a letter that she signed calling then-Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh “intellectually and morally bankrupt” contained “overheated rhetoric.”

Sports gamblers tried their luck with courts long before betting became legal

The National Football League just kicked off its new season. The opening week’s games were played against a backdrop of widespread legalized sports wagering. The Wall Street Journal recently reported that the activity, which is permissible in 32 states and the District of Columbia, is poised to generate revenue of about $4 billion in the U.S. this year.

Should federal officers get immunity for lies and beatings? SCOTUS is asked to decide

Three cert petitions ask the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal law enforcement officers and those who serve with them on joint task forces were not entitled to absolute immunity for violating constitutional rights of three people.

DOJ relies on ruling against Eugene Debs in seeking to block Texas abortion law

The U.S. Department of Justice is relying on an 1894 U.S. Supreme Court ruling involving American Railway Union leader Eugene Debs in its lawsuit seeking to block a restrictive Texas abortion law.

Justice Barrett wants to dispel notion that Supreme Court is made up of ‘partisan hacks’

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett said Sunday the justices are guided by judicial philosophies, rather than political views, but the public might not see it that way.

DOJ sues to block Texas abortion law, cites conflict with federal constitutional duties

The U.S. Department of Justice sued the state of Texas on Thursday in a bid to block its law that bans abortions at about six weeks of pregnancy.

Supreme Court will resume in-person oral arguments, but the public can’t attend

The U.S. Supreme Court announced Wednesday that it will resume in-person oral arguments when its term begins Oct. 4, but members of the public will not be allowed to be there.

SCOTUS stays execution, agrees to hear request for pastor’s hands-on, out-loud prayer in death chamber

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday evening agreed to consider a Texas inmate’s request to have a Baptist pastor lay hands on him and pray out loud during his execution.

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