COVID-19

545 ABA Journal COVID-19 articles.

It was another bad week for many BigLaw lawyers and staffers; who saw pay cuts and furloughs?
It’s not over, by any means. It has been a week since the ABA Journal reported on the latest large and midsized law firms to cut pay, reduce partner draws, and furlough or lay off staff because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Since then, at least 15 more law firms took temporary steps to reduce costs.
How the COVID-19 pandemic creates obstacles for sexual assault survivors

The virus could impact victims who may delay going to hospital because they have other priorities during the crisis, including coping with a job loss or struggling to make their rent.

Federal judge sues Allstate, claims insurer is wrongly trying to evict him during pandemic
A federal judge in Brooklyn has filed a lawsuit contending that Allstate is trying to force him and his wife to leave the property that they rented after a fire destroyed their home, despite New York’s moratorium on evictions.
Contact-tracing apps could help contain COVID-19 but raise thorny legal and privacy issues

Contract-tracing apps have been proposed as one of the tools to help combat the spread of COVID-19. But some are concerned the apps could violate privacy rights and civil liberties; criminals and foreign adversaries could use them to harvest data; and the technology might linger long after the pandemic is over.

Afternoon Briefs: Missouri sues China over COVID-19; lawyer accused of threatening cameraman

Missouri is first state to sue China over COVID-19

The state of Missouri has filed a lawsuit against China that contends that its government covered up knowledge of COVID-19 and…

Insurance company’s suit says it has no duty to cover Geragos firm’s COVID-19 business losses
Travelers Casualty Insurance Co. of America has filed a lawsuit against Geragos & Geragos that contends that it has no duty to cover the high-profile law firm’s COVID-19-related business losses.
AG Barr says Justice Department may support lawsuits if states go too far in COVID-19 constraints
U.S. Attorney General William Barr said Tuesday the Department of Justice will consider supporting lawsuits when states go too far in restricting commerce and civil liberties in the fight against COVID-19.
Utah is first state to grant diploma privilege during novel coronavirus pandemic
Because of the COVID-19 crisis, the Utah Supreme Court approved temporary diploma privilege Tuesday for individuals who are scheduled to take the July bar exam and graduated from ABA-accredited law schools with first-time bar passage rates of at least 86%.
How lawyers can manage stress and cortisol levels during the COVID-19 crisis

It is not the practice of law that is unhealthy; it is how we respond to the day-to-day stressors that are inherent in the profession that makes the difference, says lawyer James Gray Robinson.

Afternoon Briefs: Congress asked for COVID-19 lawsuit curbs; law school cuts pay for staff and faculty

Lobbyists seek COVID-19 lawsuit curbs

Lobbying groups for U.S. businesses are asking Congress to curb liability for companies that could face lawsuits in connection with COVID-19. The U.S. Chamber of…

What will change when SCOTUS hears oral arguments by phone?

The U.S. Supreme Court has a message for the nation: Please listen carefully, as our telephone options have recently changed. The high court announced that it will hold arguments by telephone conference in 10 cases in early May because of the novel coronavirus.

In new opinion, 5th Circuit halts medication abortions in Texas under nonessential surgery ban
The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at New Orleans reinstated a ban Monday on medication abortions in Texas under the governor’s order banning nonessential surgeries during the novel coronavirus pandemic.
Bar exam does little to ensure attorney competence, say lawyers in diploma privilege state

In his 60 years of law practice, Milwaukee attorney Franklyn M. Gimbel has known good and bad attorneys. And, according to him, whether they passed a bar exam, which in Wisconsin is not required for most in-state law school graduates, has no bearing on their lawyering abilities or character.

Advocacy organizations call for compassionate release of elderly, sick prisoners

The rapid spread of the novel coronavirus has renewed the focus on conditions inside the nation’s jails and prisons, many of which are struggling to implement proper cleaning and social distancing practices and protect their prisoners and staff. Elderly and sick prisoners have moved to the forefront of the conversation.

Pandemic power plays: Civil liberties in the time of COVID-19

The power to respond to a public health crisis exists in the U.S. Constitution, state constitutions, regulations and case law. But the way they fit together is not always clear, especially in the wake of a modern-day global crisis.

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