ABA Journal

Health Law

2989 ABA Journal Health Law articles.

Florida can ban businesses from requiring proof of COVID-19 vaccination, 11th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court is allowing Florida to enforce a law that bans businesses from requiring proof of a COVID-19 vaccination.

Baker & Hostetler helped client conceal ‘blatant insurance fraud,’ suit alleges

A bankruptcy trustee has filed a lawsuit alleging that Baker & Hostetler helped a client commit “blatant insurance fraud" and cause several companies to wrongly pay more than $100 million in rebates to pharmacy benefit managers that managed patients' insurance.

Letters: Real effect of overruling Roe

Dealing with Dobbs: ABA responds to the overruling of Roe with 6 resolutions

“We are setting policy on which the ABA can build to assure that ordinary acts of daily life are not criminalized,” former ABA president Laurel Bellows said. “This is criminalizing talking to your friend about her options. This is criminalizing and delaying very important medical response when a woman has suffered a miscarriage or is in a threat of harm or life because the people who would need to touch her at that moment don’t need to be worried about whether they, in fact, will be subjected to criminal charges.”

Weekly Briefs: SCOTUS justice’s wife stands by stolen-election views; district attorney’s daughter arrested in his stabbing

Ginni Thomas tells Jan. 6 committee about her stolen-election views

Conservative activist Virginia “Ginni” Thomas told the House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, U.S. Capitol attack that she…

Summer associates praise their ‘lifestyle firms,’ even as some midlevels describe them as ‘veritable sweatshops’

Summer associates liked their law firm experience this year, as they insisted that their workplaces were different—in a good way.

Texas attorney general avoids subpoenas with court ruling, alleged dodge of process server

Republican Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton fled a process server Monday and then avoided subpoenas Tuesday, when a Texas judge ruled that he didn’t have to testify in an abortion-related lawsuit.

Weekly Briefs: Bias suit against Trump lawyer resolved; Montana no longer defies court order over birth certificates

Trump lawyer resolves rap-music bias suit

Alina Habba, a lawyer for former President Donald Trump, has resolved a race- and gender-bias lawsuit largely based on the rap music that she…

Weekly Briefs: ABA supports marriage equality law; Stanford offers new model for legal ed loans

ABA president calls on Senate to support Respect for Marriage Act

ABA President Deborah Enix-Ross is calling on members of the U.S. Senate to vote for the Respect for Marriage…

Montana defies judge’s order to allow transgender people to change birth certificates, at least for now

The Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services is refusing, for now, to go along with a judge’s order to allow transgender people to change their birth certificates.

Lawyer is still entitled to disability benefits for depression linked to law practice, 6th Circuit rules

A former Traverse City, Michigan, personal injury lawyer is entitled to continued monthly payments under his disability insurance policy because of evidence that his recurrent depression makes him unable to work as a trial attorney, a federal appeals court has ruled.

SCOTUS justices discuss Supreme Court’s legitimacy, lengthy path to law license

Chief Justice John Roberts acknowledged Friday that it was “gut-wrenching” to see barricades surrounding the U.S. Supreme Court without speaking directly about the abortion-rights issue that led to the placement.

Michigan Supreme Court decision puts abortion rights on November ballot

The Michigan Supreme Court said Thursday voters can decide whether to enshrine the right to abortion in the state constitution, rejecting a challenge that a ballot proposal was defective because of typographical errors.

HIV-prevention drug coverage violated religious rights of employer opposed to ‘homosexual behavior,’ judge rules

A federal judge in Fort Worth, Texas, has ruled that the Affordable Care Act’s requirement that insurance plans cover HIV-prevention drugs violates the statutory rights of employers with religious objections. The plaintiffs had argued that providing compulsory coverage for PrEP drugs makes them “complicit in facilitating homosexual behavior.”

9th Circuit upholds ban on conversion therapy for minors in First Amendment challenge

Washington state’s ban on conversion therapy for minors does not violate the First or 14th Amendments, a federal appeals court ruled on Sept. 6.

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