ABA Journal

Health Law

2554 ABA Journal Health Law articles.

5 tips for working with clients who stand in their own way

Recently, I had an immigration case, where my client was tardy on every deadline and patently refused to do anything beyond the bare minimum to aid their cause. I was emotionally drained by the case but buoyed by the positive result at the end. I must admit I couldn’t fight the impulse to remind the client that they had stood in the way of their own success.

Supreme Court appears ready to allow abortion providers’ challenge to Texas abortion law

A U.S. Supreme Court majority appeared ready Monday to allow abortion providers to challenge the Texas abortion law that bans abortions at about six weeks of pregnancy.

Supreme Court allows vaccine mandate for health workers that didn’t offer religious exemption

Maine’s vaccine mandate for health care workers, which doesn’t allow religious exemptions, is being enforced after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to intervene Friday.

Pro bono work increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, reports show

As the National Celebration of Pro Bono comes to an end, several legal aid organizations are reporting that pro bono work actually increased during the COVID-19 pandemic as more remote volunteering opportunities became available.

New York sees decrease in pass rate for July bar exam

The overall pass rate for the July bar exam in New York is 63%, the New York State Board of Law Examiners announced Oct. 28.

43% of law students reported food insecurity worries during pandemic, survey finds

Out of 13,000 law students who participated in the annual Law School Survey of Student Engagement, 95% reported the COVID-19 pandemic interfered with their ability to concentrate, 43% had increased concerns about having enough food and 29% feared eviction and housing loss.

ABA urges Supreme Court to rule US can sue to block unconstitutional Texas abortion law

Texas “undercut the rule of law” when it passed an unconstitutional abortion law intended to evade court review, the ABA said in an amicus brief filed with the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday.

Consumers increasingly desire remote legal services, Clio CEO says

When cloud-based company Clio surveyed American consumers in 2018, 23% expressed an openness to working with a lawyer remotely.

Did pandemic make jurors more skeptical of scientific evidence? Some see a change

Jurors appear more skeptical of scientific and medical testimony following the COVID-19 pandemic, according to some lawyers and experts interviewed by Law.com.

Law firms encourage workers to return to office with these perks

Law firms are trying to entice employees to come back to the office with perks that include free food and a casual, fun atmosphere.

Has COVID-19 made the workplace more accessible for lawyers with disabilities?

Since March 2020, most law firms and legal organizations have adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic by allowing their employees to work remotely and transition to more flexible hours. For some lawyers with disabilities, teleworking has brought significant benefits, including increased access to their clients and colleagues and to more job opportunities.

Supreme Court will hear Texas abortion case on expedited basis but refuses again to block the law

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to hear two challenges to the Texas abortion law on an expedited basis and set oral arguments for Nov. 1.

Supreme Court seems to be ‘reshaping itself in Justice Thomas’ image,’ op-ed says

We may be seeing the emergence of the “Thomas Court,” as the 6-3 conservative majority on the U.S. Supreme Court considers cases involving abortion, religious freedom and gun rights this term, according to a New York Times op-ed.

From the depths of addiction to helping attorneys overcome their own, lawyer and author Brian Cuban has made his mark

In 2006, the Dallas Mavericks were in the NBA finals. The team’s owner, Mark Cuban, gave two tickets for the opening game to his brother Brian to give to friends. But the younger sibling had other plans: He traded them to his drug dealer for $1,000 worth of cocaine.

Do worker COVID-19 vaccine mandates have to offer religious exemptions? Courts differ; Breyer declines to act

Updated: U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer on Tuesday refused to block a COVID-19 vaccine mandate for Maine health care workers that did not include an exemption for religious exemptions.

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