ABA Journal

Health Law

2554 ABA Journal Health Law articles.

When the law teacher becomes the student

If there’s one thing the pandemic taught us, it’s our need for nimble adaptation. Law has historically been slow to adapt to change and innovation. But the arrival of COVID-19 changed the way we conduct business, from navigating Zoom hearings and using VPNs to juggling child care and homeschooling for those with young children. Even turning off video filters proved challenging, as illustrated by the kitty cat lawyer Zoom hearing on YouTube.

Considering mask fights, states may hold off on making COVID-19 vaccine required school immunization

Lawyers interviewed by the ABA Journal disagree on whether requiring the vaccines is the best approach for keeping children in schools, but most agree the virus has caused significant work for school administrators, many of whom are still dealing with pushback on masking rules.

SCOTUS considers expediting request to hear Texas abortion case, orders quick responses

The U.S. Supreme Court signaled Monday that it could resolve challenges to the Texas abortion law on a speedy schedule.

Once again, 5th Circuit keeps Texas abortion law in effect

Updated: The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals at New Orleans has once again kept Texas’ restrictive abortion law in effect—this time with a preliminary injunction pending an appeal.

Weekly Briefs: BigLaw firm promotes 151 to partner; legal industry adds 4,300 jobs; big gifts to law schools

Legal industry gains 4,300 jobs

The legal services industry gained 4,300 jobs in September, following a gain of 4,000 jobs in August, according to seasonally adjusted and revised numbers by…

6th Circuit rules for student athletes denied religious exemption from vaccine mandate

Sixteen student athletes at Western Michigan University who were denied a religious exemption from a vaccine mandate will likely succeed in their lawsuit, a federal appeals court has ruled.

Federal judge who blocked Texas abortion law cites these reasons for US standing to sue

The federal government has standing to sue over Texas’ restriction abortion law, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, when he blocked the law as “flagrantly unconstitutional.”

Judge on top New York court is reportedly banned from courthouse after refusing to reveal COVID-19 vaccine status

Just one judge in New York’s court system has refused to comply with the state’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate.

Sotomayor refuses to block vaccine mandate for New York City school employees

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor on Friday refused to block a vaccine requirement for employees of New York City schools.

Kavanaugh tests positive for COVID-19 but has no symptoms

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh tested positive for COVID-19 on Thursday, although he has no symptoms.

An increasing number of physicians are dismissing patients, but are they doing it legally?

Few physicians will admit to ghosting a patient. It’s the type of behavior that could lead to a lawsuit or a patient complaint to a state medical board. In some areas of medicine, patient dismissal rates are increasing, with physicians firing their patients directly and telling them to seek care elsewhere.

Senate Democrats criticize SCOTUS ‘shadow docket’ in hearing; Republicans see attempt at justice intimidation

Is the U.S. Supreme Court’s “shadow docket” of emergency orders and summary decisions being misused in a way that undermines the court’s legitimacy? Or are Democrats who are criticizing the docket trying to intimidate the justices?

The Supreme Court is in the building—contentious rulings behind, more major cases ahead

U.S. Supreme Court justices are hanging up their phones after a year and a half of teleconference arguments because of the pandemic and returning to the bench for the new term that begins Monday.

Chemerinsky: Expect a truly extraordinary year at the Supreme Court

Every Supreme Court term has important decisions that change the law and affect people’s lives, but some years are blockbusters in the number of high-profile, significant rulings. The October 2021 term, which begins on Monday, Oct. 4, promises to be such a year. It is the first full term with the court’s current composition.

There’s a decrease in signing bonuses for 2021 summer associates, new survey says

Summer associates who recently wrapped up their work say they had ample networking opportunities, received clear instructions on assignments, and found the experience affirming. But few were offered signing bonuses, according to a survey released Monday by Law360 Pulse.

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