Internet Law

1991 ABA Journal Internet Law articles.

An attack on a judge’s family is putting judicial security center stage

After a gunman opened fire at Judge Esther Salas’ suburban New Jersey home in July, killing her 20-year-old son, she made an emotional plea. But she isn’t the only one sounding the alarm and asking for greater protections and privacy for jurists. Others in the federal judiciary are taking another look at privacy protections and security at judges’ homes.

Afternoon Briefs: Facebook sued over Kenosha killing; GC says she was fired for failing to soften criticism

Facebook, militia groups and Kyle Rittenhouse sued

The partner of Anthony Huber, a man killed in Kenosha, Wisconsin, protests, is among four plaintiffs suing Facebook, militia groups and Kyle Rittenhouse,…

Classmates’ comments should be confidential, Harvard Law says in new social media policy
If you are a Harvard Law School student making a social media post about something said in class, you should not write it in a way that identifies the speaker to those who were not there, according to a new policy at the school.
This law prof has been fighting off Twitter trolls during the coronavirus crisis
While Veena Dubal was adapting to working at home with three young children during the COVID-19 pandemic, the “reply guys” came after the California law professor on Twitter for her support of a 2020 state law that extends employee classification status to gig workers.
Afternoon Briefs: 3 online law schools get state accreditation; cop immobilization maneuver can be fatal

3 fully online law schools get California accreditation

On Friday, California accreditation was given to three online law schools—the Concord Law School at Purdue University Global, the Northwestern California University…

‘Persnickety dude’ government lawyer points out New York Times typos on Twitter
An anonymous appellate lawyer who describes himself as a “persnickety dude” tweets typos from the New York Times as a hobby.
Amazon may be liable for injuries caused by defective products sold by third-party vendors, court rules
A California appeals court ruled Thursday that Amazon can be held strictly liable for injuries caused by defective products sold by third-party vendors through its online marketplace.
Macy’s uses facial recognition software to identify customers on security cameras, lawsuit claims
A would-be class action lawsuit alleges that the Macy’s department store chain violates Illinois law when it identifies customers recorded on its surveillance cameras by using facial recognition software.
Afternoon Briefs: Boston Marathon bomber wins death penalty appeal; what’s in the GOP coronavirus bill?

Appeals court overturns Boston Marathon bomber’s death sentence

A federal appeals court has overturned the death sentence for convicted Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. The 1st U.S. Circuit Court…

Afternoon Briefs: US accuses China hackers; TRO blocks restaurant reopening

US indictment accuses China of backing vaccine hackers

An indictment unsealed Tuesday accuses China of backing two hackers who stole trade secrets in a 10-year campaign waged partly for the…

Lawyer suspended after his skip-trial strategy backfires; his son is reprimanded
Updated: A father and his son, both Ohio lawyers, were sanctioned on Thursday after the father skipped his client's criminal trial and the son criticized the judge on Facebook.

Supreme Court will decide circuit split over Facebook’s use of text messages
The U.S. Supreme Court granted Facebook Inc.’s request Thursday to review a proposed class action that accuses the social media company of sending unwanted text messages.
Generic word with ‘.com’ at end can be trademarked, SCOTUS rules
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 8-1 Tuesday that a generic word with “.com” at the end is eligible for trademark protection if consumers don’t perceive it as a generic name.
Twitter dismissed from Rep. Devin Nunes’ defamation suit over parody accounts
A Virginia judge has dismissed Twitter from a $250 million defamation suit filed by Republican California congressman Devin Nunes that targeted parody accounts claiming to be written by Nunes’ mother and a cow.
Afternoon Briefs: Trump signs policing order; rogue worker tweets from court’s Twitter account

Trump signs executive order encouraging chokehold limits

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Tuesday that encourages better policing practices. The order allocates discretionary grants to police departments that seek…

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