ABA Journal

Internet Law

2055 ABA Journal Internet Law articles.

Lawyer gets reprimand for responding to negative online review with embarrassing client information

A lawyer who revealed a client’s criminal record and name when countering a negative online review violated an ethics rule that bans revelation of information relating to a representation, the Oregon Supreme Court has ruled.

Tort lawyers represent Trump in social media censorship lawsuits; is ‘state actors’ claim viable?

Personal injury lawyer John P. Coale is among the lawyers representing former President Donald Trump in censorship lawsuits against Twitter, Facebook and Google for suspending him and others from their websites.

Afternoon Briefs: Internet research is costly for juror; bar dues claim partly resurrected

Federal juror’s internet research cost over $11K

A federal judge in New Jersey has held a juror in contempt and fined him more than $11,000 for conducting internet research on…

Sex-trafficking victims can sue Facebook for allegedly facilitating their recruitment, top Texas court says

A federal law protecting websites that publish third-party content doesn’t insulate Facebook from sex-trafficking lawsuits that are based on a state statute, the Texas Supreme Court has ruled.

Lawyer suspended for ‘incendiary’ Facebook posts must complete diversity education

A South Carolina lawyer has been suspended for six months for Facebook posts about George Floyd and women’s tattoos that are “expressly incendiary,” according to the South Carolina Supreme Court.

Doctrine of laches, ‘speculative’ claim doom antitrust suits against Facebook; FTC gets second chance

In a pair of decisions Monday, a federal judge in Washington, D.C., tossed antitrust lawsuits filed against Facebook by the Federal Trade Commission and the vast majority of state attorneys general.

Supreme Court takes a byte out of computer crime law

A U.S. Supreme Court decision handed down earlier this month has flown a bit below radar compared with the term’s bigger cases, but it is one that might be of interest to anyone who has ever bent the truth on a dating website or on social media, shopped or checked sports scores on a work computer, or happens to be a fan of the 1983 movie WarGames.

Afternoon Briefs: An unusual SCOTUS lineup; suit says Google is a public utility

SCOTUS rules for defendant in career criminal case

Two conservative justices supported liberal U.S. Supreme Court justices Thursday to rule that a crime of recklessness is not a “violent felony”…

Justice Barrett parts ways with 3 conservative justices in ruling on reach of computer fraud law

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act doesn’t apply to a police officer’s search of a license plate database for an acquaintance who paid him more than $5,000.

Afternoon Briefs: BigLaw firm requires tests for unvaccinated; Florida will fine social media for candidate bans

BigLaw firm requires COVID-19 tests for unvaccinated

Lawyers and staff members at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom who don’t get vaccines will have to test negative for COVID-19 within…

Divided federal appeals court affirms ruling against former state justice regarding juror’s Twitter use

An en banc federal appeals court split 6-6 Thursday in an appeal by a former West Virginia Supreme Court justice who was seeking a hearing on a juror’s Twitter use during his fraud trial.

Maker of Snapchat can be sued for speed filter used by youths before fatal crash, 9th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court has ruled that Snapchat isn’t protected from liability by Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act in a case alleging that three youths died in a car crash after using the app’s speed filter.

11th Circuit decision ‘effectively closes the internet’s doors to the blind,’ plaintiff’s lawyers say

Websites are not public accommodations that must be accessible to blind customers unless they create an intangible barrier that excludes disabled people from accessing goods and services in a physical store, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday.

Can Congress stop Twitter from blocking users? Thomas considers idea as Supreme Court vacates Trump decision

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas considered ways that Congress could regulate Twitter and other digital platforms in a concurrence Monday to the high court’s decision to vacate a decision involving former President Donald Trump.

Google’s use of Java code was fair use, SCOTUS rules in Oracle copyright battle

Google did not violate copyright law when it copied a portion of Java programming language for use in its Android platform for smartphones, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday in a 6-2 decision.

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