ABA Journal

Internet Law

2055 ABA Journal Internet Law articles.

Can undercover cops use Snapchat content for prosecution? It depends, top state court rules

The top state court in Massachusetts on Monday ruled against a Snapchat user who was prosecuted after posting a gun video seen by a "friend" who turned out to be an undercover police officer.

Weekly Briefs: Appeals courts rule in lawyer restitution cases; tribes agree to opioid settlement

Ex-BigLaw partner must pay $537M in tax fraud scheme

Paul M. Daugerdas, a former Jenkens & Gilchrist partner, lost an appeal in his tax fraud case before the 2nd U.S.…

Lawyer kicked off LinkedIn for alleged self-promotional posts loses appeal of consumer fraud case

A New Jersey appeals court has affirmed the dismissal of a lawyer’s lawsuit against LinkedIn for kicking him off the platform.

FTC’s revised antitrust suit against Facebook survives motion to dismiss

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday allowed the Federal Trade Commission to proceed with its revised antitrust lawsuit against Facebook.

Fired K&L Gates partner is charged with cyberstalking former colleagues

Fired K&L Gates partner Willie Dennis has been charged with four counts of cyberstalking former partners and other colleagues at the law firm.

Judge gets reprimand partly for this Facebook advice to shoplifters: To avoid arrests, don’t sport green hair

A judge in Chattanooga, Tennessee, has received a public reprimand partly for his tongue-in-cheek online advice on how to avoid arrests.

Judge is suspended once again for social media posts—this time for soliciting hurricane donations

A South Carolina probate judge has been suspended for 18 months, partly for soliciting hurricane relief donations on Facebook and partly for his all-caps declaration as a would-be character witness.

Social media companies that posted ISIS content aren’t liable for Pulse nightclub shooting, 11th Circuit rules

A federal appeals court has ruled social media companies can’t be held liable for radicalizing the Pulse nightclub gunman under the federal Anti-Terrorism Act because the plaintiffs failed to show the massacre was an act of “international terrorism.”

DC Circuit rules against group seeking internet browsing histories of government officials

Internet browsing histories of government officials sought by a watchdog group aren’t “agency records” subject to disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act, a federal appeals court has ruled.

Weekly Briefs: Judge adds vaccination to bail conditions; criminal cases affected by ‘massive’ data loss

Federal judge orders vaccination as bail condition

U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff of Manhattan on Tuesday ordered a drug defendant to receive a COVID-19 vaccination as a condition of bail.…

5th Circuit rules for ‘The Hammer’ in lawyer’s trademark suit over purloined keywords and click-to-call ads

A Texas lawyer should get a chance to prove that consumers who entered his trademarked keywords in search engines were confused when they saw unlabeled advertisements, clicked on them, and found themselves calling a number that belonged to a legal referral group, a federal appeals court has ruled.

This New York attorney uses TikTok to shed light on lawyer life

Unhappy young lawyers often share a common lament: “If only I’d known what being a lawyer was really like.” It’s easy to understand the disconnect. After all, TV shows, movies and the media focus primarily on the endgame—the trial, the closing, the conviction. There’s rarely much about the day-to-day legal work leading up to that big moment—assuming there is one at all. Cecillia X. Xie is out to change that.

Texas lawyer pleads guilty to passing public PACER documents to Mexican drug traffickers

A lawyer with an office in McAllen, Texas, has pleaded guilty to violating the Travel Act by accessing the PACER court database and using his cellphone to pass the publicly available information to drug traffickers.

Web designer who offers wedding websites can be compelled to serve same-sex couples, 10th Circuit says

A Colorado anti-discrimination law can be used to compel a website designer who wants to create wedding websites to offer her services to people celebrating same-sex marriages, a federal appeals court ruled Monday.

Afternoon Briefs: Cravath tops this ranking; 2 court victories for transgender youths

Cravath tops Vault rankings

Vault has named its most prestigious law firms in America, based on a survey of associates at peer firms. The top five in the 2022 Vault…

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