ABA Journal

Legal Writing

317 ABA Journal Legal Writing articles.

Bryan Garner’s 2021 legal writing tips

This year, Bryan Garner gave us tips for using legal dictionaries, a three-part series on how to manage a day’s worth of legal writing, and an ode to a state bar journal that’s championing the use of plain English.

Check out our 9 favorite Instagram posts from 2021

It's been quite a year in the legal industry and for coverage here at the ABA Journal, and it's hard to believe that 2022 is right around the corner.

How to effectively use legal dictionaries

Many dictionary users don’t realize the extent of the improvements that take place from edition to edition of a dictionary. Perhaps that’s especially true with Black’s Law Dictionary, which has been substantially remade over the past quarter-century.

Advokat

This short story was the winner of the 2021 Ross Writing Contest for Legal Short Fiction

Only 2 women make list of most cited legal scholars

A list of the 50 most cited U.S. legal scholars of all time contains many well-known names but only two women.

Discover the man behind ‘12 Angry Men’ and the real-life case that inspired him

Whenever the ABA Journal has conducted a survey to find the best legal movies or the best legal plays, 12 Angry Men has made the list. But the path to becoming a classic was not a simple one, and the man behind the script was not a simple man.

From the depths of addiction to helping attorneys overcome their own, lawyer and author Brian Cuban has made his mark

In 2006, the Dallas Mavericks were in the NBA finals. The team’s owner, Mark Cuban, gave two tickets for the opening game to his brother Brian to give to friends. But the younger sibling had other plans: He traded them to his drug dealer for $1,000 worth of cocaine.

Typo in 1928 Supreme Court opinion created ‘reign of error,’ law prof says

A tiny typographical error in a 1928 U.S. Supreme Court opinion had a big impact after it was picked up in subsequent opinions and used to bolster arguments for property rights, a law professor has found.

Missing apostrophe in Facebook post leads to defamation suit

An Australian real estate agent is facing a defamation lawsuit because of a missing apostrophe in his Facebook post. The real estate agent wrote the post about his former employer and his alleged failure to pay money into Australia’s retirement system.

What’s wrong with legal writing?

By diminishing law students’ belief in the power of storytelling, we rob them of the creativity and legal imagination crucial for effective lawyering, writes Philip N. Meyer, a professor at Vermont Law School and the author of Storytelling for Lawyers.

Bryan Garner touts the Michigan Bar Journal’s celebration of plain English

The Michigan Bar Journal has just reached a landmark of 37 years in sustaining its monthly column on plain language in the law. Over the years, the column has exploded all the various myths about plain language in the law.

How has practicing in the Supreme Court changed throughout the years?

This month’s Asked and Answered podcast is looking at how advocacy has changed in the country’s highest court. It’s part of a special series on how lawyers’ work has changed over the years.

When the Supreme Court cites your amicus brief

When the U.S. Supreme Court releases a decision, the parties and their lawyers scan the opinions to determine whether they won or lost. Meanwhile, those who filed amicus curiae, or friend of the court, briefs in the case also want to know the outcome. But first, they are eager to find the answer to a different question: Did one of the justices cite my brief?

Law student who sees ‘healing and beauty’ in writing wins ABA Journal’s 2021 Ross essay contest for legal fiction

A law student in Tennessee is the winner of the 2021 ABA Journal/Ross Writing Contest for Legal Short Fiction.

Federal appeals judge criticizes disparate-impact theory; are his opinions op-ed columns?

A federal appeals judge who is attracting national attention for his “aggressive rhetoric” in legal opinions has written a concurrence criticizing disparate-impact theory, likening it to critical race theory.

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