ABA Journal

Multidisciplinary Practice

18 ABA Journal Multidisciplinary Practice articles.

When the law teacher becomes the student

If there’s one thing the pandemic taught us, it’s our need for nimble adaptation. Law has historically been slow to adapt to change and innovation. But the arrival of COVID-19 changed the way we conduct business, from navigating Zoom hearings and using VPNs to juggling child care and homeschooling for those with young children. Even turning off video filters proved challenging, as illustrated by the kitty cat lawyer Zoom hearing on YouTube.

Attorneys and the art and science of persuasion

A great deal of practicing law is persuading someone to believe, act or agree with your client’s position, whether it is in a courtroom, a boardroom, a negotiation or at a dinner table. We seek to persuade juries, judges, colleagues, friends, family or the press that we are right and that others are not. Unfortunately, the art of persuasion is not taught in all law schools.

The victory lap: Why I still go to the office after retirement

If your firm offers the opportunity to maintain an office after retirement, give it serious consideration. If the offer is to maintain a virtual relationship, consider that, too.

11 tips to survive your freshman year as an associate

Concerns about starting your first job after law school are justified. It is terrifying. For many, the first year as an associate will be your first professional job. Little has prepared you for the difficult, confusing and stressful first year ahead.

The death of a lawyer: A journey from law school to retirement

On some mornings, fog shrouds the Ohio River, settling into the river valley like loosely applied caulk. Twenty-three years ago, while on my way to work, my car weaved through the thick, shape-shifting strands as I navigated Kellogg Avenue, which follows the contours of the river toward downtown Cincinnati.

How to know when it’s time to send a client packing

Unlike other relationships, a lawyer-client obligation can spawn without the lawyer even consenting to it, writes Marcel Strigberger.

Lawyer and author shares her holiday wishes for women lawyers

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there are more than 400,000 women lawyers in America today, and women comprise more than 36% of practicing lawyers. Women are working at all levels of practice and in every specialty area. They are smart, competent, thorough, dedicated and much more. But that does not mean it is easy for any of them.

The power of decency in the legal profession

There is a fever in America today. This fever is running at a very high pitch, and it has nothing to do with the pandemic.

Social justice meets Pro Bono Week: What is your plan?

Thirty-five years ago, I was a know-nothing 25-year-old associate at Shook, Hardy & Bacon, where I still practice, when a senior partner asked me to take a case on behalf of a single parent.

Will the COVID-19 pandemic fundamentally remake the legal industry?

Many technological changes being adopted now will persist beyond COVID-19, as will the utilization of remote working. Meanwhile, others have suggested the widespread upheaval will provide fuel for state reviews of whether to open up the legal marketplace to alternative business structures and nonlawyer practitioners.

Law practice vs. legal academia: Can we build a bicultural world?

The widest gap between the courthouse and the university is a cultural one, says lawyer and law professor Dan Canon. One can speak fluent legalese without knowing how to navigate the world of legal academia. So how do we achieve a better blend of the two?

Is my law firm preparing me for success in the next decade?

Every lawyer, from the solo practitioner to lawyers in large international firms, should ask themselves this question, says lawyer Thomas Aertgeerts. For young lawyers and law students, this is even more important.

7 ways lawyers can join the fight to curb climate change

There are two paths lawyers can take in response to the crisis. We can mutter, “We’re screwed,” and go back to practicing law and living high-carbon lifestyles. Or we can devote time and resources to help ensure a livable future, says lawyer Matthew Metz.

How to build new pillars of the law firm

Looking back at the past 50 years, life as a lawyer has been fairly stable and good. The legal profession has served as a foundation for all societies around the world, and legal services are in demand both during recessions and economic booms, which has secured legal professionals some incredible salaries.

DC Bar considers relaxing its already-lenient rules to allow nonlawyer ownership of law firms

The District of Columbia Bar is considering changes to its ethics rules that could allow external ownership of law firms, as well as businesses in which lawyers and nonlawyers provide both legal and nonlegal services.

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