ABA Journal

Government

5485 ABA Journal Government articles.

Runaway Sentences

Will mandatory arbitration be banned beyond in workplace sex assault and harassment complaints?

Forced arbitration has long been a controversial practice in the United States. At least one component of forced arbitration, however, has now ended.

ABA works to provide nonpartisan info and protect access to the ballot box

Dealing with Dobbs: ABA responds to the overruling of Roe with 6 resolutions

“We are setting policy on which the ABA can build to assure that ordinary acts of daily life are not criminalized,” former ABA president Laurel Bellows said. “This is criminalizing talking to your friend about her options. This is criminalizing and delaying very important medical response when a woman has suffered a miscarriage or is in a threat of harm or life because the people who would need to touch her at that moment don’t need to be worried about whether they, in fact, will be subjected to criminal charges.”

Weekly Briefs: SCOTUS justice’s wife stands by stolen-election views; district attorney’s daughter arrested in his stabbing

Ginni Thomas tells Jan. 6 committee about her stolen-election views

Conservative activist Virginia “Ginni” Thomas told the House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, U.S. Capitol attack that she…

Trump doesn’t have to detail claims about planted documents to special master, judge says

There is no need for former President Donald Trump to raise objections to the government’s inventory of documents seized from his Mar-a-Lago home in Palm Beach, Florida—at least at this stage of his lawsuit, a federal judge ruled Thursday.

Supreme Court ready to tackle free speech, affirmative action and election law in new term

The U.S. Supreme Court—and those in its orbit—has been going through the usual machinations leading up to a new term in recent weeks: Panels of law professors and practitioners are previewing the big cases of the new term, and a few justices are making public appearances to send one message or another.

2nd Circuit gives Trump chance to avoid rape defamation suit with ruling on employee status

Updated: A federal appeals court ruled Tuesday that former President Donald Trump was a government employee when he denied rape claims by writer E. Jean Carroll, a decision that could shield Trump from personal liability in the woman’s defamation lawsuit.

Chemerinsky: Supreme Court poised to sharply advance the law to the right

Last year’s term was momentous: The court overruled Roe v. Wade, greatly expanded gun rights and aggressively protected free exercise of religion. There is no doubt that the coming term, too, will be filled with blockbuster decisions.

Texas attorney general avoids subpoenas with court ruling, alleged dodge of process server

Republican Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton fled a process server Monday and then avoided subpoenas Tuesday, when a Texas judge ruled that he didn’t have to testify in an abortion-related lawsuit.

Lawyer who says student-loan forgiveness leaves him worse off sues to block program

Updated: An Indiana lawyer who will have part of his student debt forgiven through the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program has filed a lawsuit challenging student-debt cancellation by the Biden administration.

My Kavanaugh tips were never investigated by the FBI, say Akin Gump partner and others

Controversy and secrecy still surround the FBI’s probe of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, conducted after Christine Blasey Ford testified during his nomination hearing that he sexually assaulted her during a party that they attended in high school.

California’s ban on private immigration detention facilities violates supremacy clause, 9th Circuit rules

An en banc federal appeals court ruled Monday that California’s ban on private detention facilities is unconstitutional when applied to facilities used to detain immigrants.

2 law schools change names because of namesakes’ notorious pasts

Two law schools are officially changing their names after learning more about their namesakes’ long-ago conduct.

What is a writ of replevin? It’s being used by the DOJ against former White House adviser

Updated: Writs of replevin have been used by creditors to recover collateral, such as cars; by tenants or landlords to recover property taken by the other; by businesses to recover items taken by employees; and by people seeking the return of pets after a breakup. It’s also being cited by the U.S. Department of Justice in a lawsuit against a former senior White House adviser.

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