ABA Journal

Government

4971 ABA Journal Government articles.

Biden nominates first openly LGBTQ woman to a federal appeals court

President Joe Biden’s sixth round of judicial nominees includes a Vermont Supreme Court justice who would be the first openly LGBTQ woman to serve on a federal appeals court.

Bipartisan bill would make it easier to discharge federal student loans in bankruptcy after waiting period

A bipartisan bill unveiled Tuesday would make it easier to discharge federal student loans in bankruptcy after a 10-year waiting period.

This law school had the widest gap between student debt and graduate earnings

Students at many higher-education schools are facing an unhappy truth: Their student debt dwarfs their salaries two years after graduation.

Investigators conclude Cuomo sexually harassed women; ‘the typical rules did not apply,’ says one employee

A report by investigators appointed by New York Attorney General Letitia James has found that New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo sexually harassed multiple women, including former and current state employees.

7th Circuit sees no constitutional problem with Indiana University’s COVID-19 vaccine requirements

A federal appeals court has rejected an injunction request by eight Indiana University students who claim that COVID-19 vaccine requirements violate their 14th Amendment right to “personal autonomy” and “bodily integrity.”

Hackers accessed at least 80% of email accounts in New York federal prosecutors’ offices, DOJ says

Hackers accessed at least 80% of email accounts used by employees in the four U.S. attorney’s offices in New York over a period of more than seven months last year, the U.S. Department of Justice revealed Friday.

Troubling Treatment: Efforts are underway to reform teen behavioral programs

At age 15, Chelsea Filer tried to run away and live with her grandparents. A couple of weeks later, two large men, who worked with a transport company hired by her mother, woke her up in the middle of the night. The men took her across the border to a private residential school and treatment center in Mexico. “When children are legally kidnapped and trafficked across state or border lines, they lose their rights and any protections from the jurisdiction of their home state,” says Filer, who is now a youth rights advocate in Sacramento, California.

Our ‘calling’ demands more of us as lawyers in the public square

When we choose a career in the law, it is not about simply getting a job. It is a choice to join a learned, self-governing profession. We say a person is “called to the bar” because that is what law is—a calling. Part of that calling involves upholding and defending the rule of law, the principle that all of us are equal in the eyes of the law and no person is above the law.

States drive a wave of bills affecting transgender youth

States have filed more than 250 bills affecting LGBTQ people this year—including more than 120 anti-trans bills. Opponents say the proposed legislation promotes discrimination and prejudice and could negatively impact trans youths’ mental health.

The ABA has advocated for people with HIV/AIDS for more than 30 years

While the American Bar Association has mobilized to help the public and profession during the COVID-19 pandemic, this is not the first time the association has addressed the challenge of a new and deadly virus. At the height of the United States’ AIDS epidemic, the ABA helped lead the charge to decrease discrimination against people who were infected with HIV.

ABA lobbying efforts are an important member service

One of the most valuable benefits enjoyed by every member of the American Bar Association—and indirectly, by every attorney in America—is the ABA’s advocacy on their behalf in Washington, D.C.

Aug. 15, 1876: Congress passes the ‘Sell or Starve’ Act

Despite their historic victory at Little Bighorn in June 1876, the Sioux found little relief from the white onslaught. Accepting defeat, they returned to their reservations—unarmed and newly dependent on government rations. And on Aug. 15, 1876, Congress passed legislation that became known as the “Sell or Starve” Act, halting any aid to the Sioux until they relinquished both their hunting rights and their claim to the Black Hills.

Treasury must provide Congress with Trump’s tax returns, Justice Department says in legal opinion

The U.S. Treasury Department must turn over former President Donald Trump’s tax returns to Congress because it has provided facially valid reasons for the request, according to an opinion released…

US sells one-of-a-kind Wu-Tang Clan album to satisfy forfeiture judgment of ‘Pharma Bro’

Federal prosecutors in New York have sold a one-of-a-kind Wu-Tang Clan album to help satisfy a forfeiture judgment against “Pharma Bro” Martin Shkreli, a former drug company CEO convicted of securities fraud.

DOJ won’t defend congressman accused of helping incite US Capitol riot

The U.S. Department of Justice is refusing to represent a Republican lawmaker accused in a lawsuit of helping incite the U.S. Capitol riot in a speech that he gave Jan. 6.

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