ABA Journal

Government

5057 ABA Journal Government articles.

Want to change a veteran’s life through pro bono? There’s a manual for that

Since World War II, more than 2 million service members have been discharged from U.S. military service with a status other than "honorable discharge." Having a discharge that falls below a certain level can impact a veteran's access to pensions, GI Bill education benefits, health care, insurance or home loans, as well as carrying a stigma.

ABA Giving Day is an opportunity ‘to help ensure a just society,’ says ABA president

For the second year, the ABA is asking members to join in its efforts to address significant issues that affect their communities.

Considering mask fights, states may hold off on making COVID-19 vaccine required school immunization

Lawyers interviewed by the ABA Journal disagree on whether requiring the vaccines is the best approach for keeping children in schools, but most agree the virus has caused significant work for school administrators, many of whom are still dealing with pushback on masking rules.

Trump suit says executive privilege can’t be waived by Biden in Capitol records fight

Former President Donald Trump filed a lawsuit Monday that calls the U.S. House of Representative's Jan. 6 committee’s request for records in connection with the U.S. Capitol riot “a vexatious, illegal fishing expedition.”

Weekly Briefs: Lawyer censured over false time sheets; California law allows ‘stealthing’ suits

Lawyer censured for seeking no-show pay

Lawyer Laura Cail, of Rensselaer County, New York, has been censured for filing false time sheets to collect more than $12,000 for work that…

US should investigate potential civil rights violations of jailed Capitol riot defendants, judge says

A federal judge found Washington, D.C., jail officials in civil contempt Wednesday for failing to promptly forward medical records of a U.S. Capitol riot defendant with a broken hand to federal officials who would approve surgery.

Tree ordinance was an unconstitutional taking, 6th Circuit rules

A Michigan township’s ordinance requiring property owners to replace trees that they remove from their property or pay into a tree fund was an unconstitutional condition on their rights under the takings clause, a federal appeals court has ruled.

ABA Commission on Immigration offers students ‘hands-on’ experience with people in detention

“A lot of people frequent the hotline, so you build a relationship with these callers who are really trying their best to understand the process,” says Emma Yznaga, who was an intern with the ABA Commission on Immigration’s Detention and Legal Orientation Program Information Line for four months.

Top state court upholds trust provision requiring beneficiary to be unmarried

The Indiana Supreme Court has upheld a trust provision that made distribution of an inheritance contingent on the beneficiary being unmarried.

Texas clerk’s ‘idiosyncratic system’ of choosing jury panels could lead to thousands of overturned verdicts

A district clerk in Brazoria County, Texas, divided up potential jurors by region and race to assemble jury venires, an “idiosyncratic system” that could potentially lead to thousands of over overturned verdicts.

Does executive privilege still protect Trump after his term ends? Fight brews over congressional subpoenas

Former President Donald Trump is asserting executive privilege to fight a request for presidential records sought by the House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot. Can he do that after his presidential term ends?

Following a 12% pay cut, UMass law professor challenges collective bargaining law for university staff

A University of Massachusetts School of Law professor is suing his union, his university and the state over a law that gives the union exclusive rights to represent him in salary negotiations and grievance procedures.

Justice Department lawyers threatened mass resignations if Trump appointed loyalist to pursue election claims

Top Justice Department lawyers and White House counsel Pat Cipollone threatened mass resignations during a White House meeting in which they opposed President Donald Trump’s plan to install a loyalist as acting attorney general to help him overturn the election results through voter fraud investigations.

6th Circuit rules for student athletes denied religious exemption from vaccine mandate

Sixteen student athletes at Western Michigan University who were denied a religious exemption from a vaccine mandate will likely succeed in their lawsuit, a federal appeals court has ruled.

Montana law school dean resigns after complaints about the oversight of Title IX allegations

Paul Kirgis, dean of the University of Montana’s Alexander Blewett III School of Law, has resigned from his post.

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