ABA Journal

Government

4865 ABA Journal Government articles.

Afternoon Briefs: Transgender patients protected; gender gap persists in SCOTUS arguments

Transgender patients protected in HHS interpretation

The Biden administration will protect transgender patients from discrimination in health care, reversing a decision by the Trump administration, according to an announcement…

Federal judge complains that New York’s federal detention facilities ‘are run by morons’

U.S. District Judge Colleen McMahon of the Southern District of New York reluctantly sentenced a drug conspiracy defendant to the mandatory minimum of five years in prison last month, as she complained about the "inhuman" conditions that the woman had to endure at federal detention facilities in New York City.

Removal of ‘Holy Spirit’ juror requires new trial for former lawmaker, en banc 11th Circuit rules

Former U.S. Rep. Corrine Brown of Florida is entitled to a new trial in an alleged charity scam because a federal judge removed a juror for his "Holy Spirit" remark, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday in a 7-4 en banc decision.

Afternoon Briefs: DNA on murder weapon isn’t from executed man; lawmakers embrace firing-squad executions

DNA suggests murder was carried out by someone other than executed man

DNA tests on a murder weapon and a bloody shirt are not a match with the man executed…

Judges aren’t persuaded by Capitol rioters’ claims that Trump asked them to do it

Judges are rejecting claims of U.S. Capitol rioters that they should be released before trial because they were following the direction of former President Donald Trump.

Federal judge strikes down nationwide eviction moratorium for exceeding statutory authority

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., has set aside a nationwide eviction moratorium that was set to expire June 30, ruling that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention did not have the authority under federal law to impose the moratorium.

Federal judge orders DOJ to release memo that said Trump shouldn’t be prosecuted for obstruction

A U.S. Department of Justice memo concluding that former President Donald Trump should not be prosecuted for obstruction of justice was not protected by privilege because then-U.S. Attorney General William Barr had already reached that conclusion, a federal judge ruled Monday.

Parking lot tiff between judge and politician’s son leads to ethics investigation

A parking lot tiff between a judge and the son of a former House of Representatives speaker in Arkansas has led to an ethics investigation by the Arkansas Judicial Discipline and Disability Commission.

After ransomware attack on state attorney general’s office, hackers begin posting documents

Hackers have posted documents that are said to be stolen from the Illinois attorney general’s office, including documents labeled “judgments entered,” “shakedown cases” and “state prisoners.”

Justice Thomas argues for repeal of doctrine protecting military from tort suits incident to service

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas argued Monday that the high court should have agreed to hear an appeal by a West Point cadet to repeal a doctrine that has protected the military from tort lawsuits by service members outside combat.

Afternoon Briefs: ABA president comments on Law Day rule-of-law theme; virtual grand juries upheld

ABA president notes significance of Law Day theme

ABA President Patricia Lee Refo said this year’s Law Day theme—“Advancing the Rule of Law Now”—is particularly significant considering last year’s events.…

District attorney is removed from office under rarely used state law

A North Carolina district attorney was removed from office Tuesday in a process that began with an affidavit filed by a grassroots group of victims’ families.

In unusual lineup, Supreme Court sides with immigrant challenging removal

The U.S. Supreme Court’s three liberal justices joined with three conservatives Thursday to rule for an immigrant who claimed that the government’s notices to appear for removal proceedings didn’t follow the statutory mandate.

Afternoon briefs: Search of Giuliani’s home is ‘legal thuggery,’ says his lawyer; top legal officer earns $50.9M

Search of Giuliani’s home is ‘legal thuggery,’ his lawyer says

Federal agents searched lawyer Rudy Giuliani’s New York City apartment and office early Wednesday. Giuliani’s lawyer, Robert Costello, told the…

Retired BigLaw partner tells tales of lawyers, FBI and kidnapping epidemic of 1930s in new book

Any discussion of kidnapping during the early 20th century calls to mind the 1932 abduction and killing of aviator Charles Lindbergh’s toddler son. But as Carolyn Cox demonstrates, kidnapping for ransom extended far beyond the “crime of the century.”

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