Government

4836 ABA Journal Government articles.

Woman is eligible for asylum because domestic abusers persecuted her for feminist opinions, 9th Circuit says
A woman who was persecuted by domestic abusers because of a feminist political opinion is eligible for asylum in the United States, a federal appeals court ruled Monday.
As Florida Coastal tries to get student loan funds reinstated, ABA seeks teach-out plan
The U.S. Department of Education has terminated the Florida Coastal School of Law’s access to federal student financial aid, and the for-profit school has been directed to file a teach-out plan with the ABA’s Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar.
Afternoon Briefs: Final 4 justices named in SCOTUSblog brackets; law firms open Northern California offices

SCOTUSblog releases final 4 justices

SCOTUSblog readers have narrowed down the list of justices in the running for the greatest U.S. Supreme Court justice of all time. The March Madness-style…

Company donates 1.2M eggs to food banks as part of lawsuit settlement
The Hillandale Farms Corp. is donating 1.2 million eggs to food banks in New York to settle a state price-gouging lawsuit.
Georgia lawmakers pass bill to revamp citizens arrest law, once used to justify lynchings
The Georgia legislature on Wednesday banned most arrests by private citizens in a reworking of a citizens arrest law that was cited in the past to justify lynchings.
Afternoon Briefs: Uber ordered to pay $1.1M to blind passenger; state supreme court overturns mask mandate

Uber must pay $1.1M after drivers discriminated against woman who is blind, arbitrator says

Uber has been ordered to pay a San Francisco woman—who is blind and uses a…

Chemerinsky: SCOTUS weighs whether freedom of speech applies to students off campus using social media
The U.S. Supreme Court will hear its last oral arguments of the term in April, and it will finish with a First Amendment case of potential great importance. Mahanoy Area School District v. B.L. involves whether a student can be punished for speech on social media over the weekend.
Police are often first responders to mental health crises, but tragedies are prompting change

Cases such as Quintonio LeGrier’s have prompted demands around the country to reform how police respond to people in mental health crises, a movement that advocates believe can help avert such deadly confrontations.

Lawyers find their skill sets make them ideal candidates for college presidencies

A rapidly growing number of lawyers have been chosen to lead higher education institutions during an era when experts say the job has become much more difficult because of the ever-increasing regulatory demands and crises presidents must confront.

Lawyers and the ABA are on front lines in protecting the bedrock of our democracy

While the rule of law has been the foundation of America since its birth, recent events and unprecedented attacks on our institutions underscore the need to remain vigilant about protecting it. The COVID-19 pandemic, ongoing racial injustice and attempts to disrupt the peaceful transfer of presidential power have all highlighted broader challenges around justice in America.

Attorneys lend skills to help current and former service members
Costly municipal fines and fees spark a movement for reform

Across the country, Americans are being hit with hefty fines and fees for petty violations, advocates for reform say, igniting a movement pressing for change. “Code enforcement exists to promote public health and safety, but the way we’re seeing it happen across the country right now is to make money,” Institute for Justice attorney Kirby Thomas West says.

Advocate for important issues by engaging Congress online at ABA Day 2021
Reluctant trial witnesses should disclose vaccination status to judge, motion says
Witnesses who want to avoid in-person testimony at an upcoming trial should disclose their vaccination status and explain their bid to testify remotely, according to a motion filed in a suit alleging retirement-plan mismanagement.
Prof who refused to use transgender student’s preferred pronouns can pursue suit, 6th Circuit rules
The Cincinnati-based 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has reinstated a First Amendment lawsuit by a public college professor in Ohio who violated school policy by refusing to use a transgender student’s preferred pronouns.

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