Government

4836 ABA Journal Government articles.

Supreme Court will decide whether Kentucky AG can pick up defense of invalidated abortion law
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to decide whether Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron can intervene to defend an invalidated state abortion law after no other state official would continue to defend it.
Biden’s first judicial picks include DC Circuit nominee Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, said to be SCOTUS contender
President Joe Biden announced 11 judicial nominees Tuesday, including three Black women nominated for federal appeals courts.
Amy Breihan has dedicated her career to helping juvenile lifers seek parole

It’s been nearly nine years since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Miller v. Alabama that mandatory life without parole for juveniles violates the Eighth Amendment. It’s been five years since it held in Montgomery v. Louisiana that its 2012 decision was retroactive. In that time, Amy Breihan has helped seek second chances for prisoners in Missouri who were younger than age 18 when they were sentenced to life behind bars.

US News releases its 2022 law school rankings; which schools had lowest student debt?

Five law schools repeated last year’s results when they snagged the top spots in rankings released Tuesday by U.S. News & World Report. The same schools took the top spots in the 2021 rankings, but there were some small changes in the top 14 list.

How quickly can Biden deliver on policing reform?

President Joe Biden promised criminal justice reforms but has had to balance competing interests between progressives and moderates as he finalizes his Cabinet.

Falling behind on rent could mean jail time in one state, but that could change

Only Arkansas permits criminal consequences for nonpayment of rent—and it has enforced the law during the pandemic. Now, after ProPublica investigated the practice, some legislators want to revoke the statute.

Voluntarily intoxicated rape victims aren’t ‘mentally incapacitated,’ top state court rules
Victims who willingly consume alcohol or drugs before they are sexually assaulted aren’t “mentally incapacitated,” the Minnesota Supreme Court ruled Wednesday.
Georgia governor signs bill overhauling state’s elections
Georgia Republican Gov. Brian Kemp signed sweeping voting restrictions into law on Thursday, just months after a Democrat won the presidential election in the state for the first time in nearly 30 years.
Secret camera recordings can be used against nanny at trial, state supreme court says
A divided Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled Thursday that secretly recorded audio can be used against a nanny accused of assaulting three young children.
Virginia becomes the first Southern state to eliminate the death penalty
Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam signed a bill ending the death penalty Wednesday, making Virginia the 23rd state to eliminate capital punishment and the first Southern state to do so.
In ‘The Watergate Girl,’ Jill Wine-Banks gives an inside look at the special prosecution team that brought down Nixon
Jill Wine-Banks was barely 30 when she became an assistant Watergate special prosecutor investigating President Richard M. Nixon. In The Watergate Girl: My Fight for Truth and Justice Against a Criminal President, Wine-Banks (who was then known as Jill Wine Volner) shares her experience battling political obstruction, courtroom legal wrangling and the era's sexism.
Afternoon Briefs: Christian baker faces trial in new bias case; city approves housing reparations

Christian baker faces new bias case

A Christian baker is facing a new bias claim after persuading the U.S. Supreme Court that a Colorado agency showed impermissible hostility to…

High tech can heighten discrimination; here are some policy recommendations for its ethical use
From federal surveillance of social justice protests to facial recognition technology that results in inordinately high false positives for certain demographic groups, recent surveillance trends have deep historical roots and troubling future implications for traditionally marginalized groups. These trends threaten our core constitutional values, democratic principles and the rule of law.
Education Department announces plan it claims will help scammed students discharge school debt
A 2019 U.S. Department of Education policy on student debt discharge, which raised the burden of proof for applicants claiming that they were misled by their schools and put in place a plan that only granted partial relief for some, was rescinded Thursday.
Afternoon Briefs: Multistate suit challenges coronavirus relief provision; Crowell combines with boutique

Lawsuit challenges tax provision in COVID-19 relief bill

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost has filed a lawsuit challenging a tax provision in the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package. The provision…

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