ABA Journal

Members Who Inspire

44 ABA Journal Members Who Inspire articles.

Schiff Hardin partner and former Green Beret leads firm’s pro bono pilot program for veterans

Led by Mir Ali, Schiff Hardin lawyers in the Veterans Consortium Pro Bono Program have started representing veterans and their loved ones in appealing U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs denials of benefits.

When things go wrong, immigrants serving in the military look to Margaret Stock

Alaska lawyer Margaret Stock fought new restrictions on MAVNIs–service members in the Military Accessions Vital to the National Interest program, which recruited immigrants with highly desired skills.

Meet 8 ABA members who inspired us in 2018

The ABA Journal launched the Members Who Inspire column in 2017 to highlight ABA members who are doing important and interesting things in their personal and professional lives.

Source of Solace: Off the bench, federal judge dedicates time to helping others

U.S. District Judge Jay C. Zainey co-founded SOLACE more than 15 years ago. Support of Lawyers/Legal Personnel—All Concern Encouraged members try to help fellow members of the legal community and their families in times of need.

Olympic medal-winning attorney fights sexual abuse and discrimination in athletics

Olympic gold medalist Nancy Hogshead-Makar backed a new law that requires Olympics governing bodies to try to prevent the sexual, physical and emotional abuse of amateur athletes.

Showrunners: Couple’s friendly fundraising competition launches marathon event

Lawyers Crystal and Michael Freed organized marathons and other events to raise money for legal aid and awareness of human trafficking.

California attorney devotes his career to helping children navigate immigration courts

Martin Gauto, a senior attorney for Clinic (the Catholic Legal Immigration Network Inc.) in Los Angeles, has represented hundreds of immigrant children who were apprehended at the U.S. border after fleeing abusive situations in countries such as Mexico, Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala.

San Diego clinic founder helps human trafficking victims rebuild their lives

As founder and president of the Free to Thrive legal clinic in San Diego, Jamie Quient uses her networking skills to get her clients access to safe housing, drug treatment programs and job training.

Former prosecutor advocates for criminal justice reform

As deputy director of the ACLU of Florida, Melba Pearson approaches criminal justice issues with the eye of a prosecutor and the heart of a civil liberties activist.

Advocating for at-risk children is Richard Hooks Wayman’s mission

Richard Hooks Wayman is national executive director of the Children’s Defense Fund. The privately financed nonprofit promotes medical care, education, housing, nutrition and safety for children, particularly the 13 million who live in poverty.

Chang Wang walks the line to teach constitutional law in Beijing

Chang Wang has been an ABA member since 2011 and has participated in many ABA committees on topics such as immigration and naturalization, international law, and arts and cultural heritage law. He has adjunct faculty and guest lecturer status at several institutions and works to fire up students with the same love for constitutional law he discovered in himself

Pointing a Lens at Legal History

Ludwig van Beethoven composed an ode to joy. Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote an ode to the west wind. Connecticut attorney Michael Koskoff wrote an ode to the jury trial—and it became the movie Marshall, starring Chadwick Boseman as a young Thurgood Marshall.

Lifting a Lamp

Iman Boundaoui grew up knowing that good fortune is not earned. “You don’t choose the circumstances that you were born into,” she says. “Fortune is a gift. So you think: How can you use it to empower people, to inspire people, to encourage people?”

From Cop to Counsel: Former police officer now serves the homeless as a social worker and attorney

Jeff Yungman started his career as a street cop in New Orleans. He loved the city, and he loved his job. Somewhere along the line, though, he realized that he cared more about social justice than about criminal justice.